datatracker.ietf.org
Sign in
Version 5.7.4, 2014-11-12
Report a bug

HIP-based Virtual Private LAN Service (HIPLS)
draft-henderson-hip-vpls-08

Document type: Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Document stream: No stream defined
Last updated: 2014-11-12
Intended RFC status: Unknown
Other versions: plain text, pdf, html

Stream State:No stream defined
Document shepherd: No shepherd assigned

IESG State: I-D Exists
Responsible AD: (None)
Send notices to: No addresses provided

Network Working Group                                       T. Henderson
Internet-Draft                                  University of Washington
Intended status: Experimental                                  S. Venema
Expires: May 16, 2015                                 The Boeing Company
                                                               D. Mattes
                                                       Tempered Networks
                                                       November 12, 2014

             HIP-based Virtual Private LAN Service (HIPLS)
                      draft-henderson-hip-vpls-08

Abstract

   The Host Identity Protocol (HIP) and architecture adds a
   cryptographic name space to name Internet hosts.  This draft
   describes a use case of the HIP architecture, which is to provide a
   HIP-enabled virtual private LAN service (VPLS) over an untrusted
   network.  In this case, HIP is used to secure tunnels between the
   provider edge (PE) equipment.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 16, 2015.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect

Henderson, et al.         Expires May 16, 2015                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                    HIPLS                    November 2014

   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Reference model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Service description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  System description  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.1.  Provisioning the PEs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.2.  Walkthrough of unicast protocol operation . . . . . . . .   7
     5.3.  Names and access control lists  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.4.  Walkthrough of multicast operation  . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.5.  Mobility, multihoming, and address families . . . . . . .   9
   6.  Proposed extensions to HIP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   9.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   10. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     10.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     10.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

1.  Introduction

   Virtual private networks (VPNs) are popular in the wide-area Internet
   and also among enterprises that wish to separate multiple LAN
   broadcast domains across shared network infrastructure.  Several
   techniques have been defined to provide VPNs at different layers in
   the stack, including layer-1 [RFC4847], layer-2 (virtual LAN, virtual
   private LAN service (VPLS), and pseudo-wire (PW)) [RFC4664], and
   layer-3 (virtual router and BGP/MPLS provider-provisioned VPNs)
   [RFC4176].

   The Host Identity Protocol (HIP) [RFC5201] and architecture [RFC4423]
   adds a new public-key-based name space for use as host identifiers in
   Internet protocols.  HIP specifies a means for hosts to use public
   keys to authenticate one another over Internet protocols and to set
   up secure data channels using Encapsulating Security Payload
   [RFC5202] and possibly other transports in the future.

[include full document text]