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Survey of IPv4 Addresses in Currently Deployed IETF Transport Area Standards Track and Experimental Documents
RFC 3794

Document type: RFC - Informational (June 2004; No errata)
Document stream: IETF
Last updated: 2013-03-02
Other versions: plain text, pdf, html

IETF State: (None)
Consensus: Unknown
Document shepherd: No shepherd assigned

IESG State: RFC 3794 (Informational)
Responsible AD: Bert Wijnen
Send notices to: <pekkas@netcore.fi>, <Jonne.Soininen@nokia.com>,<bob@thefinks.com>

Network Working Group                                      P. Nesser, II
Request for Comments: 3794                    Nesser & Nesser Consulting
Category: Informational                                A. Bergstrom, Ed.
                                              Ostfold University College
                                                               June 2004

            Survey of IPv4 Addresses in Currently Deployed
     IETF Transport Area Standards Track and Experimental Documents

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2004).

Abstract

   This document seeks to document all usage of IPv4 addresses in
   currently deployed IETF Transport Area documented standards.  In
   order to successfully transition from an all IPv4 Internet to an all
   IPv6 Internet, many interim steps will be taken.  One of these steps
   is the evolution of current protocols that have IPv4 dependencies.
   It is hoped that these protocols (and their implementations) will be
   redesigned to be network address independent, but failing that will
   at least dually support IPv4 and IPv6.  To this end, all Standards
   (Full, Draft, and Proposed) as well as Experimental RFCs will be
   surveyed and any dependencies will be documented.

Table of Contents

   1.0.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2
   2.0.  Document Organization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2
   3.0.  Full Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2
   4.0.  Draft Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   5.0.  Proposed Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   6.0.  Experimental RFCs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
   7.0.  Summary of Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
         7.1.  Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
         7.2.  Draft Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
         7.3.  Proposed Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
         7.4.  Experimental RFCs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
   8.0.  Security Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
   9.0.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

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RFC 3794       IPv4 Addresses in the IETF Transport Area       June 2004

   10.0. Normative Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
   11.0. Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
   12.0. Full Copyright Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

1.0.  Introduction

   This document is part of a document set aiming to document all usage
   of IPv4 addresses in IETF standards.  In an effort to have the
   information in a manageable form, it has been broken into 7 documents
   conforming to the current IETF areas (Application,  Internet,
   Operations & Management, Routing, Security, Sub-IP and Transport).

   For a full introduction, please see the introduction [1].

2.0.  Document Organization

   The rest of the document sections are described below.

   Sections 3, 4, 5, and 6 each describe the raw analysis of Full,
   Draft, and Proposed Standards, and Experimental RFCs.  Each RFC is
   discussed in its turn starting with RFC 1 and ending with (around)
   RFC 3100. The comments for each RFC are "raw" in nature.  That is,
   each RFC is discussed in a vacuum and problems or issues discussed do
   not "look ahead" to see if the problems have already been fixed.

   Section 7 is an analysis of the data presented in Sections 3, 4, 5,
   and 6.  It is here that all of the results are considered as a whole
   and the problems that have been resolved in later RFCs are
   correlated.

3.0.  Full Standards

   Full Internet Standards (most commonly simply referred to as
   "Standards") are fully mature protocol specification that are widely
   implemented and used throughout the Internet.

3.1.  RFC 768 User Datagram Protocol

   Although UDP is a transport protocol there is one reference to the
   UDP/IP interface that states;  "The UDP module must be able to
   determine the source and destination internet addresses and the
   protocol field from the internet header."  This does not force a
   rewrite of the protocol but will clearly cause changes in
   implementations.

Nesser II & Bergstrom        Informational                      [Page 2]
RFC 3794       IPv4 Addresses in the IETF Transport Area       June 2004

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