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Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) Deployment Scenarios
RFC 4611

Document type: RFC - Best Current Practice (August 2006; No errata)
Also Known As BCP 121
Document stream: IETF
Last updated: 2013-03-02
Other versions: plain text, pdf, html

IETF State: WG Document
Consensus: Unknown
Document shepherd: No shepherd assigned

IESG State: RFC 4611 (Best Current Practice)
Responsible AD: David Kessens
Send notices to: <dmm@1-4-5.net>,<sob@harvard.edu>

Network Working Group                                         M. McBride
Request for Comments: 4611                                     J. Meylor
BCP: 121                                                        D. Meyer
Category: Best Current Practice                              August 2006

    Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) Deployment Scenarios

Status of This Memo

   This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the
   Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2006).

Abstract

   This document describes best current practices for intra-domain and
   inter-domain deployment of the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol
   (MSDP) in conjunction with Protocol Independent Multicast Sparse Mode
   (PIM-SM).

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................2
      1.1. BCP, Experimental Protocols, and Normative References ......3
   2. Inter-domain MSDP Peering Scenarios .............................4
      2.1. Peering between PIM Border Routers .........................4
      2.2. Peering between Non-Border Routers .........................5
      2.3. MSDP Peering without BGP ...................................7
      2.4. MSDP Peering at a Multicast Exchange .......................7
   3. Intra-domain MSDP Peering Scenarios .............................7
      3.1. Peering between MSDP- and MBGP-Configured Routers ..........8
      3.2. MSDP Peer Is Not BGP Peer (or No BGP Peer) .................8
      3.3. Hierarchical Mesh Groups ...................................9
      3.4. MSDP and Route Reflectors .................................10
      3.5. MSDP and Anycast RPs ......................................11
   4. Security Considerations ........................................11
      4.1. Filtering SA Messages .....................................11
      4.2. SA Message State Limits ...................................12
   5. Acknowledgements ...............................................12
   6. References .....................................................12
      6.1. Normative References ......................................12
      6.2. Informative References ....................................13

McBride, et al.          Best Current Practice                  [Page 1]
RFC 4611               MSDP Deployment Scenarios             August 2006

1.  Introduction

   MSDP [RFC3618] is used primarily in two deployment scenarios:

   o  Between PIM Domains

      MSDP can be used between Protocol Independent Multicast Sparse
      Mode (PIM-SM) [RFC4601] domains to convey information about active
      sources available in other domains.  MSDP peering used in such
      cases is generally one-to-one peering, and utilizes the
      deterministic peer-RPF (Reverse Path Forwarding) rules described
      in the MSDP specification (i.e., it does not use mesh-groups).
      Peerings can be aggregated on a single MSDP peer.  Such a peer can
      typically have from one to hundreds of peerings, which is similar
      in scale to BGP peerings.

   o  Within a PIM Domain

      MSDP is often used between Anycast Rendezvous Points (Anycast-RPs)
      [RFC3446] within a PIM domain to synchronize information about the
      active sources being served by each Anycast-RP peer (by virtue of
      IGP reachability).  MSDP peering used in this scenario is
      typically based on MSDP mesh groups, where anywhere from two to
      tens of peers can comprise a given mesh group, although more than
      ten is not typical.  One or more of these mesh-group peers may
      also have additional one-to-one peerings with MSDP peers outside
      that PIM domain for discovery of external sources.  MSDP for
      anycast-RP without external MSDP peering is a valid deployment
      option and common.

   Current best practice for MSDP deployment utilizes PIM-SM and the
   Border Gateway Protocol with multi-protocol extensions (MBGP)
   [RFC4271, RFC2858].  This document outlines how these protocols work
   together to provide an intra-domain and inter-domain Any Source
   Multicast (ASM) service.

   The PIM-SM specification assumes that SM operates only in one PIM
   domain.  MSDP is used to enable the use of multiple PIM domains by
   distributing the required information about active multicast sources
   to other PIM domains.  Due to breaking the Internet multicast
   infrastructure down to multiple PIM domains, MSDP also enables the
   possibility of setting policy on the visibility of the groups and
   sources.

   Transit IP providers typically deploy MSDP to be part of the global
   multicast infrastructure by connecting to their upstream and peer

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