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Negotiation for IPv6 Datagram Compression Using IPv6 Control Protocol
RFC 5172

Network Working Group                                     S. Varada, Ed.
Request for Comments: 5172                                    Transwitch
Obsoletes: 2472                                               March 2008
Category: Standards Track

 Negotiation for IPv6 Datagram Compression Using IPv6 Control Protocol

Status of This Memo

   This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
   Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
   Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
   and status of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) provides a standard method of
   encapsulating network-layer protocol information over point-to-point
   links.  PPP also defines an extensible Link Control Protocol, and
   proposes a family of Network Control Protocols (NCPs) for
   establishing and configuring different network-layer protocols.

   The IPv6 Control Protocol (IPV6CP), which is an NCP for a PPP link,
   allows for the negotiation of desirable parameters for an IPv6
   interface over PPP.

   This document defines the IPv6 datagram compression option that can
   be negotiated by a node on the link through the IPV6CP.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................2
      1.1. Specification of Requirements ..............................2
   2. IPV6CP Configuration Options ....................................3
      2.1. IPv6-Compression-Protocol ..................................3
   3. Security Considerations .........................................4
   4. IANA Considerations .............................................5
   5. Management Considerations .......................................5
   6. Acknowledgments .................................................5
   7. References ......................................................5
      7.1. Normative References .......................................5
      7.2. Informative References .....................................6

Varada                      Standards Track                     [Page 1]
RFC 5172               IPv6 Datagram Compression              March 2008

1.  Introduction

   PPP [1] has three main components:

      1) A method for encapsulating datagrams over serial links.

      2) A Link Control Protocol (LCP) for establishing, configuring,
         and testing the data-link connection.

      3) A family of Network Control Protocols (NCPs) for establishing
         and configuring different network-layer protocols.

   In order to establish communications over a point-to-point link, each
   end of the PPP link must first send LCP packets to configure and test
   the data link.  After the link has been established and optional
   facilities have been negotiated as needed by the LCP, PPP must send
   NCP packets to choose and configure one or more network-layer
   protocols.  Once each of the chosen network-layer protocols has been
   configured, datagrams from each network-layer protocol can be sent
   over the link.  The link will remain configured for communications
   until explicit LCP or NCP packets close the link down, or until some
   external event occurs (power failure at the other end, carrier drop,
   etc.).

   In the IPv6 over PPP specification [2], the NCP, or IPV6CP, for
   establishing and configuring IPv6 over PPP is defined.  The same
   specification defines the Interface Identifier parameter, which can
   be used to generate link-local and globally unique IPv6 addresses,
   for negotiation.

   In this specification, the compression parameter for use in IPv6
   datagram compression is defined.  Together with RFC 5072 [2], this
   document obsoletes RFC 2472 [13].  However, no protocol changes have
   been introduced over RFC 2472.

1.1.  Specification of Requirements

   In this document, several words are used to signify the requirements
   of the specification.

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [3].

Varada                      Standards Track                     [Page 2]
RFC 5172               IPv6 Datagram Compression              March 2008

2.  IPV6CP Configuration Options

   IPV6CP Configuration Options allow negotiation of desirable IPv6
   parameters.  IPV6CP uses the same Configuration Option format as
   defined for LCP [1] but with a separate set of Options.  If a

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