IPv6-Ready DNS/DNSSSEC Infrastructure
draft-bp-v6ops-ipv6-ready-dns-dnssec-00

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Last updated 2018-10-10
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v6ops                                                           C. Byrne
Internet-Draft                                              T-Mobile USA
Intended status: Informational                         J. Palet Martinez
Expires: April 13, 2019                                 The IPv6 Company
                                                        October 10, 2018

                 IPv6-Ready DNS/DNSSSEC Infrastructure
                draft-bp-v6ops-ipv6-ready-dns-dnssec-00

Abstract

   This document defines the timing for implementing a worldwide
   IPv6-Ready DNS and DNSSEC infrastructure, in order to facilitate the
   global IPv6-only deployment.

   A key issue for this, is the need for a global support of DNSSEC and
   DNS64, which in some scenarios do not work well together.  This
   document states that any DNSSEC signed resources records should
   include a native IPv6 resource record as the most complete and
   expedient path to solve any deployment conflict with DNS64 and DNSSEC

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 13, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents

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   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  The Conflict Between DNS64 and DNSSEC . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Resolving the DNS64 and DNSSEC Conflict by Requiring AAAA . .   3
   5.  Ensuring a smooth IPv4-IPv6 transition by Requiring AAAA  . .   4
   6.  Definition of IPv6-Ready DNS/DNSSEC Infrastructure  . . . . .   4
   7.  Implementation timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   9.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   10. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   11. Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   One of the main issues to ensure the best path for the IPv4 to IPv6
   transition and the support of an IPv6-only Internet, is to ensure
   that all the services remain accessible by means of DNS.

   One of the alternatives is the use of NAT64 ([RFC6146]) and DNS64
   ([RFC6147]), sometimes by means 464XLAT ([RFC6877]), which will help
   to ensure that, when a network or part of it, becomes IPv6-only,
   still can have access to IPv4-only resources.

   DNS64 ([RFC6147]) is a widely deployed technology allowing hundreds
   of millions of IPv6-only hosts/networks to reach IPv4-only resources.
   DNSSEC is a technology used to validate the authenticity of
   information in the DNS, however, as DNS64 ([RFC6147]) modifies DNS
   answers and DNSSEC is designed to detect such modifications, DNS64
   ([RFC6147]) can break DNSSEC in some circumstances.

   Furthermore, the deployment of those transition mechanisms means that
   the cost of the transition is on the back of the service provider,
   because the investment required in the devices that take care of that
   transition services and the support of the helpdesks to resolve
   issues.  So in the end, all that cost is indirectly charged to the
   end-user, which is unfair.

   It seems obvious that should not be that way, and the end-goal is a
   situation where we get rid-off IPv4-only services, and meanwhile, the

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