Analysis of the 64-bit Boundary in IPv6 Addressing
draft-carpenter-6man-why64-00

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Last updated 2014-01-05
Replaced by draft-ietf-6man-why64, rfc7421
Stream (None)
Intended RFC status (None)
Formats pdf htmlized bibtex
Stream Stream state (No stream defined)
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
RFC Editor Note (None)
IESG IESG state I-D Exists
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
6MAN                                                   B. Carpenter, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                         Univ. of Auckland
Intended status: Informational                                  T. Chown
Expires: July 10, 2014                              Univ. of Southampton
                                                                 F. Gont
                                                  SI6 Networks / UTN-FRH
                                                                S. Jiang
                                            Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd
                                                             A. Petrescu
                                                               CEA, LIST
                                                          A. Yourtchenko
                                                                   cisco
                                                         January 6, 2014

           Analysis of the 64-bit Boundary in IPv6 Addressing
                     draft-carpenter-6man-why64-00

Abstract

   The IPv6 unicast addressing format includes a separation between the
   prefix used to route packets to a subnet and the interface identifier
   used to specify a given interface connected to that subnet.
   Historically the interface identifier has been defined as 64 bits
   long, leaving 64 bits for the prefix.  This document discusses the
   reasons for this fixed boundary and the issues involved in treating
   it as a variable boundary.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 10, 2014.

Carpenter, et al.         Expires July 10, 2014                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                   Why 64                     January 2014

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Scenarios for prefixes longer than /64  . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Insufficient address space delegated  . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Concerns over ND cache exhaustion . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Interaction with IPv6 specifications  . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Possible areas of breakage  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Experimental observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  Privacy issues  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   7.  Implementation and deployment issues  . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   8.  Conclusion  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   9.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   10. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   11. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   12. Change log [RFC Editor: Please remove]  . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   13. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     13.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     13.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

1.  Introduction

   The IPv6 addressing architecture [RFC4291] specifies that a unicast
   address is divided into n bits of subnet prefix followed by (128-n)
   bits of interface identifier (IID).  Since IPv6 routing is entirely
   based on variable length subnet masks, there is no architectural
   assumption that n has any particular fixed value.  However, RFC 4291
   also describes a method of forming interface identifiers from IEEE
   EUI-64 hardware addresses [IEEE802] and this does specify that such
Show full document text