An IETF with Much Diversity and Professional Conduct
draft-crocker-diversity-conduct-04

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Network Working Group                                         D. Crocker
Internet-Draft                               Brandenburg InternetWorking
Intended status: Informational                                  N. Clark
Expires: December 9, 2015                             Pavonis Consulting
                                                            June 7, 2015

          An IETF with Much Diversity and Professional Conduct
                   draft-crocker-diversity-conduct-04

Abstract

   The process of producing today's Internet technologies, through a
   culture of open participation and diverse collaboration has proved
   strikingly efficient and effective, and it is distinctive among
   standards organizations.  For its early years, participation in the
   IETF and its antecedent was almost entirely composed of well-funded,
   American, white, male engineers, demonstrating a distinctive and
   challenging group dynamic, both in management and in personal
   interactions.  In the case of the IETF, interaction style can often
   contain singularly aggressive behavior, often including singularly
   hostile tone and content.  Groups with greater diversity make better
   decisions.  Obtaining meaningful diversity requires more than generic
   good will and statements of principle.  Many different behaviors can
   serve to reduce participant diversity or participation diversity.
   This document discusses IETF participation, in terms of the nature of
   diversity and practical issues that can increase or decrease it.  The
   document represents the authors' assessments and recommendations,
   following general disussions of the issues in the IETF.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 9, 2015.

Crocker & Clark         Expires December 9, 2015                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft             Diversity & Conduct                 June 2015

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Concerns  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.1.  Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.2.  Harassment and Bullying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   3.  Constructive Participation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     3.1.  Access  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     3.2.  Engagement  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.3.  Facilitation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.4.  Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.5.  IETF Track Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     3.6.  Avoiding Distraction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   4.  Responses to Unconstructive Participation . . . . . . . . . .  13
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   6.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
     6.1.  References - Normative  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
     6.2.  References - Informative  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   Appendix A.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16

1.  Introduction

   The Internet Engineering Task Force [IETF] grew out of a research
   effort that was started in the late 1960s, with central funding by
   the US Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA,
   later DARPA), employing a collection of research sites around the
   United States, and including some participation by groups of the US
   Military.  The community was originally restricted to participation
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