Analysis of the Crime Attribution Characteristics of Various IPv6 Address Assignment Techniques
draft-daveor-ipv6-crime-attribution-00

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Internet Engineering Task Force                              D. O'Reilly
Internet-Draft                                            April 24, 2018
Intended status: Informational
Expires: October 26, 2018

   Analysis of the Crime Attribution Characteristics of Various IPv6
                     Address Assignment Techniques
                 draft-daveor-ipv6-crime-attribution-00

Abstract

   The migration from IPv4 to IPv6 is intended to fix a large number of
   problems with IPv4 that have been identified through many years of
   global use, not least of which is the shortage of available IPv4
   addresses.  One of the challenges with IPv4 that has not, apparently,
   been adequately considered is the crime attribution characteristics
   of IPv6 technologies.

   The challenge of crime attribution on the Internet is an important
   one and a careful balance needs to be struck between the needs of law
   enforcement, the rights of crime victims and the right to privacy of
   the vast majority of Internet users who have no involvement in any
   sort of criminality.

   The purpose of this document is to consider the crime attribution
   characteristics of various IPv6 address assignment techniques.

Status of This Memo

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   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on October 26, 2018.

O'Reilly                Expires October 26, 2018                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft           IPv6 Crime Attribution               April 2018

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.2.  Background on IPv6 Address Architecture . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.  IPv6 Endpoint Address Assignment  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     2.1.  Manual IPv6 Address Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
       2.1.1.  Crime Attribution Characteristics . . . . . . . . . .   8
         2.1.1.1.  Locating a host using a manually assigned IPv6
                   address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
         2.1.1.2.  Rogue clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     2.2.  DHCPv6  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       2.2.1.  Crime Attribution Characteristics . . . . . . . . . .   9
         2.2.1.1.  Availability of Attribution Records . . . . . . .  10
         2.2.1.2.  Rogue clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     2.3.  SLAAC: Stateless Address Autoconfiguration  . . . . . . .  10
       2.3.1.  Stable Address Autoconfiguration  . . . . . . . . . .  11
       2.3.2.  Temporary Address Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . .  12
       2.3.3.  Crime Attribution Characteristics . . . . . . . . . .  14
         2.3.3.1.  Stateless Address Autoconfiguration . . . . . . .  14
         2.3.3.2.  SLAAC with stable interface identifiers . . . . .  15
         2.3.3.3.  SLAAC with temporary interface identifiers  . . .  15
     2.4.  IPv4 and IPv6 Coexistence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
       2.4.1.  Crime Attribution Characteristics . . . . . . . . . .  17
         2.4.1.1.  Mapping/Translation Technologies  . . . . . . . .  17
         2.4.1.2.  Tunnelling Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
     2.5.  IPv6 Mobility Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
       2.5.1.  Crime Attribution Characteristics . . . . . . . . . .  20
         2.5.1.1.  Attribution of the activity of the mobile node
                   from information available at the home network  .  20
         2.5.1.2.  Attribution of the activity of the mobile node
                   from information available at the care-of network  21
         2.5.1.3.  The ephemeral nature of correspondent
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