Pronouncing and Using Chinese Personal Names
draft-deng-chinese-names-05

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Last updated 2016-12-26
Stream ISE
Intended RFC status Informational
Formats plain text xml pdf html bibtex
Stream ISE state Submission Received
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state I-D Exists
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Network Working Group                                            H. Deng
Internet-Draft                                                    Z. Cao
Intended status: Informational                                    Huawei
Expires: June 29, 2017                                        P. Hoffman
                                                          VPN Consortium
                                                       December 26, 2016

              Pronouncing and Using Chinese Personal Names
                      draft-deng-chinese-names-05

Abstract

   This document gives general rules for how to pronounce Mandarin
   Chinese names in conversation, and how to determine which name is
   someone's surname.  It also covers some other related topics about
   Chinese names.  The intent is to allow IETF participants who are not
   familiar with Chinese to communicate better with Chinese
   participants.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on June 29, 2017.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must

Deng, et al.              Expires June 29, 2017                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                Chinese names                December 2016

   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Pronouncing Chinese Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Background  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Introduction to the Pinyin System . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.3.  Pronouncing Pinyin Words  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
       2.3.1.  Pronouncing the Initial Sound . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
       2.3.2.  Pronouncing the Final Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
       2.3.3.  Examples  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   3.  Using Chinese Personal Names  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Difference Between Written and Spoken Order . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  Women's Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  Inferring Gender from Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  Use of English Names  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  Writing the Four Tones  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  Using Titles  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   10. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   11. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   12. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   13. Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

1.  Introduction

   In typical conversations in the IETF, people's names are used
   heavily.  In face-to-face meetings, people will speak about other
   participants by name both formally and informally ("Mr.  Smith
   says..." or "Bob says..."), and the same is true about how people
   sometimes refer to each other on working group mailing lists.  Most
   times, people want to use other people's names correctly, to be both
   more precise and more polite.

   The number of Chinese participants in the IETF, both in face-to-face
   meetings and on mailing lists, has greatly increased in recent years.
   Many non-Chinese participants have a difficult time knowing how to
   pronounce a Chinese name that they encounter on a mailing list, RFC,
   or name badge.  In fact, many people don't know how to tell which of
Show full document text