Native IPv6 Behind NAT44 CPEs (6a44)
draft-despres-6a44-01

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Last updated 2012-06-21 (latest revision 2012-04-23)
Replaces draft-despres-softwire-6a44, draft-despres-intarea-6a44
Stream ISE
Intended RFC status Experimental
Formats plain text pdf html
Stream ISE state (None)
Document shepherd None
IESG IESG state Approved-announcement to be sent
Telechat date
Responsible AD Ralph Droms
IESG note ISE Submission
Send notices to brian.e.carpenter@gmail.com, dwing@cisco.com, shengjiang@huawei.com, despres.remi@laposte.net, draft-despres-6a44@tools.ietf.org, rfc-ise@rfc-editor.org
RFC Editor RFC Editor state TO
Internet Engineering Task Force                          R. Despres, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                 RD-IPtech
Intended status: Experimental                               B. Carpenter
Expires: October 25, 2012                              Univ. of Auckland
                                                                 D. Wing
                                                                   Cisco
                                                                S. Jiang
                                                                  Huawei
                                                          April 23, 2012

                  Native IPv6 Behind NAT44 CPEs (6a44)
                         draft-despres-6a44-01

Abstract

   In customer sites having IPv4-only CPEs, Teredo provides a last
   resort IPv6 connectivity [RFC4380] [RFC5991] [RFC6081].  However,
   because it is designed to work without involvement of Internet
   service providers, it has significant limitations (connectivity
   between IPv6 native addresses and Teredo addresses is uncertain;
   connectivity between Teredo addresses fails for some combinations of
   NAT types). 6a44 is a complementary solution that, being base on ISP
   cooperation, avoids these limitations. 6a44 uses specific prefixes
   assigned by local ISPs (rather than the anycast address used by
   Teredo, an evolution similar to that from 6to4 to 6rd).  The
   specification is complete enough for actual deployment, including
   with independently written codes.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on October 25, 2012.

Copyright Notice

Despres, et al.         Expires October 25, 2012                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft    Native IPv6 Behind NAT44 CPEs (6a44)        April 2012

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Requirements Language  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   3.  Definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   4.  Design Goals, Requirements, and Model of Operation . . . . . .  6
     4.1.  Hypotheses about NAT Behavior  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     4.2.  Native IPv6 Connectivity for unmanaged Hosts behind
           NAT44's  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     4.3.  Operational Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     4.4.  Model of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   5.  6a44 Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   6.  Specification of Clients and Relays  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     6.1.  Packet Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     6.2.  IPv6 Packet Encapsulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     6.3.  6a44 Bubbles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     6.4.  Maximum Transmission Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
     6.5.  6a44 Client Specification  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
       6.5.1.  Tunnel Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
       6.5.2.  Client Transmission  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
       6.5.3.  Client Reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
     6.6.  6a44 Relay Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
       6.6.1.  Relay Reception in IPv6  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
       6.6.2.  Relay Reception in IPv4  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
     6.7.  Implementation of Automatic Sunset . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
   7.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Show full document text