Control-/Data Plane Aspects for N6 Traffic Steering
draft-fattore-dmm-n6-cpdp-trafficsteering-00

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Last updated 2018-09-20
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Distributed Mobility Management (DMM)                         U. Fattore
Internet-Draft                                                M. Liebsch
Intended status: Standards Track                                     NEC
Expires: March 24, 2019                               September 20, 2018

          Control-/Data Plane Aspects for N6 Traffic Steering
            draft-fattore-dmm-n6-cpdp-trafficsteering-00.txt

Abstract

   Current standardization effort on the evolution of the mobile
   communication system reconsiders the mobile data plane protocol.  The
   IETF DMM Working Group has work that proposes and analyzes various
   protocols as alternative to the GPRS Tunneling Protocol for User
   Plane (GTP-U) for an overlay deployment in between the mobile
   device's assigned data plane anchor and its current radio base
   station, which are denoted as N9 and N3 interfaces.  In the view of
   some future deployment and the original intent per the very early DMM
   WG charter, a mobile device's data plane anchor may be highly
   distributed and re-selected for optimization throughout a mobile
   device's communication with one or more correspondent services.  Such
   re-configuration has impact on the packet routing in between the
   mobile device's data plane anchor and the one or multiple data
   networks hosting the services, which is denoted as N6 interface.
   This draft proposes and discusses a solution to control, setup and
   maintain traffic treatment policy on the cellular communication
   system's N6 interface while taking the UE's PDU session settings per
   the cellular system's control plane, such as QoS and locator
   information, into account.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on March 24, 2019.

Fattore & Liebsch        Expires March 24, 2019                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        CPDP for N6 Traffic Steering        September 2018

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Table of Contents

   1.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   3.  Positioning of N6 policy control  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.1.  System architecture for mobile access to data networks  .   4
     3.2.  Use cases with demand for N6 traffic treatment policy . .   7
   4.  N6 traffic treatment - Requirements and policy types  . . . .   8
   5.  Leveraging the mobile control plane for N6 policy control . .   9
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   8.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   9.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12

1.  Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

2.  Introduction

   Recent releases and deployments of cellular mobile communication
   systems utilize an overlay on the mobile data plane to forward a
   mobile device's data packets in between the mobile device and an
   anchor point, which serves as first hop router to the mobile device.
   The overlay is realized by the GPRS Tunneling Protocol for user plane
   (GTP-U), which is able to carry network-specific attributes in the
   tunnel protocol headers.

   The 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) is in charge of the
   cellular mobile communication system's specification and is currently

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