C3DC -- Constrained Client/Cross-Domain Capable Authorization Profile for Authentication and Authorization for Constrained Environments (ACE)
draft-gerdes-ace-c3dc-00

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Last updated 2018-10-23
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ACE Working Group                                              S. Gerdes
Internet-Draft                                               O. Bergmann
Intended status: Standards Track                              C. Bormann
Expires: April 26, 2019                          Universitaet Bremen TZI
                                                        October 23, 2018

 C3DC -- Constrained Client/Cross-Domain Capable Authorization Profile
for Authentication and Authorization for Constrained Environments (ACE)
                        draft-gerdes-ace-c3dc-00

Abstract

   Resource-constrained nodes come in various sizes and shapes and often
   have constraints on code size, state memory, processing capabilities,
   user interface, power and communication bandwidth (RFC 7228).

   This document specifies a profile that describes how two autonomous
   resource-constrained devices, a client and a server, obtain the
   required keying material and authorization information to securely
   communicate with each other.  Each of the devices is coupled with a
   less-constrained device, the authorization manager, that helps with
   difficult authentication and authorization tasks.  The constrained
   devices do not need to register with authorization managers from
   other security domains.  The profile specifically targets constrained
   clients and servers.  It is designed to consider the security
   objectives of the owners on the server and the client side.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 26, 2019.

Gerdes, et al.           Expires April 26, 2019                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                    C3DC                      October 2018

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.  Protocol  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.1.  Overview  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.2.  Details for the C3DC profile as an instance of the DTLS
           profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     2.3.  Details for the C3DC profile as an instance of the OSCORE
           profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   3.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     6.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     6.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   The ACE framework [I-D.ietf-ace-oauth-authz] describes how a client
   obtains authorization to access a (probably constrained [RFC7228])
   server from the server's authorization manager.  Without additional
   support, constrained clients will have difficulties to communicate
   with authorization managers from other security domains.  They need
   to be configured with the necessary keying material to securely
   communicate with the AS.  Manual configuration is not a feasible
   solution for the Internet of Things where the large number of nodes
   makes scalability a special concern.  Also, constrained devices often
   lack user interfaces and displays and have slow response times, which
   make their configuration tedious.  Therefore, the configuration of
   the client is best done using a less-constrained device that mediates
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