Operational Implications of IPv6 Packets with Extension Headers
draft-gont-v6ops-ipv6-ehs-packet-drops-00

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IPv6 Operations Working Group (v6ops)                            F. Gont
Internet-Draft                                    SI6 Networks / UTN-FRH
Intended status: Informational                               N. Hilliard
Expires: January 2, 2016                                            INEX
                                                              G. Doering
                                                             SpaceNet AG
                                                                  W. Liu
                                                     Huawei Technologies
                                                               W. Kumari
                                                                  Google
                                                            July 1, 2015

    Operational Implications of IPv6 Packets with Extension Headers
               draft-gont-v6ops-ipv6-ehs-packet-drops-00

Abstract

   This document summarizes the security and operational implications of
   IPv6 extension headers, and attempts to analyze reasons why packets
   with IPv6 extension headers may be dropped in the public Internet.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 2, 2016.

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   Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   publication of this document.  Please review these documents

Gont, et al.             Expires January 2, 2016                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft           IPv6 Extension Headers                July 2015

   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Previous Work on IPv6 Extension Headers . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Security Implications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Operational Implications  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.1.  Enforcing infrastructure ACLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.2.  Route-Processor Protection  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.3.  DDoS Management and Customer Requests for Filtering . . .   5
     4.4.  ECMP and Hash-based Load-Sharing  . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.5.  Packet Forwarding Engine Constraints  . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  A Possible Attack Vector  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12

1.  Introduction

   IPv6 Extension Headers (EHs) allow for the extension of the IPv6
   protocol, and provide support for core functionality such as IPv6
   fragmentation.  However, widespread implementation limitations
   suggest that EHs present a challenge for IPv6 packet routing
   equipment, and evidence exists to suggest that IPv6 with EHs may be
   intentionally dropped on the public Internet in some network
   deployments.

   Discussions about the security and operational implications of IPv6
   extension headers are a regular feature in IETF working groups and
   other places.  Often in these discussions, important security and
   operational issues are overlooked.

   This document tries to raise awareness about the security and
   operational implications of IPv6 Extension Headers, and presents
   reasons why some networks drop packets containing IPv6 Extension
   Headers.

   Section 2 of this document summarizes the work that has been done in
   the area of IPv6 extension headers.  Section 3 discusses the security
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