ALTO for the blockchain
draft-hommes-alto-blockchain-02

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Network Working Group                                          S. Hommes
Internet-Draft                                                    B. Fiz
Intended status: Standards Track                                R. State
Expires: July 9, 2017                           University of Luxembourg
                                                               A. Zuenko
                                                              R. Caetano
                                                                Stratumn
                                                              V. Gurbani
                                                       Bell Laboratories
                                                        January 05, 2017

                        ALTO for the blockchain
                    draft-hommes-alto-blockchain-02

Abstract

   With the inception of the Bitcoin cryptocurrency, the underlying
   concept of the blockchain has now attracted a large number of
   application scenarios.  Due to the decentralised nature of a typical
   blockchain service, a reliable communication between the different
   nodes is a mandatory requirement.  RFC7285 describes the idea of
   using Application-Layer Traffic Optimization (ALTO) that is used to
   improve the communication in peer-to-peer networks.  This document
   describes the benefits of using ALTO in the context of a blockchain
   network, and highlights the improvements for a private, consortium
   and public blockchain.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 9, 2017.

Hommes, et al.            Expires July 9, 2017                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft               ALTO-blockchain                January 2017

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Blockchain Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Private Blockchains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Consortium Blockchains  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.3.  Public Blockchains  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Peer Selection using ALTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.1.  Deployment of Private and Consortium Blockchains  . . . .   5
     3.2.  Deployment of Public Blockchains  . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.3.  Clustering  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Information-Propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  The Bitcoin Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  Instructions to the RFC Editor  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10

1.  Introduction

   With the inception of the Bitcoin cryptocurrency, the underlying
   concept of the blockchain has now attracted a large number of
   application scenarios.

   The blockchain is a distributed ledger technology that stores assets
   in the form of transactions.  All transactions are further collected
   into blocks.  The process of finding a new block requires the
   validation of transactions, which are then included into the blocks.
   Each block contains a chained hash of its previous block, which
   protects the blockchain against alterations.  Any modification of a
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