Privacy Terminology
draft-iab-privacy-terminology-00

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Last updated 2012-01-10
Replaces draft-hansen-privacy-terminology
Replaced by draft-iab-privacy-considerations, rfc6973
Stream IAB
Intended RFC status (None)
Formats pdf htmlized bibtex
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RFC Editor Note (None)
Network Working Group                                          M. Hansen
Internet-Draft                                                  ULD Kiel
Intended status: Informational                             H. Tschofenig
Expires: July 13, 2012                            Nokia Siemens Networks
                                                                R. Smith
                                                               JANET(UK)
                                                        January 10, 2012

                          Privacy Terminology
                  draft-iab-privacy-terminology-00.txt

Abstract

   Privacy is a concept that has been debated and argued throughout the
   last few millennia by all manner of people.  Its most striking
   feature is that nobody seems able to agree upon a precise definition
   of what it actually is.  In order to discuss privacy in any
   meaningful way a tightly defined context needs to be elucidated.  The
   specific context of privacy used within this document is that of
   "personal data", any information relating to a data subject; a data
   subject is an identified natural person or a natural person who can
   be identified, directly or indirectly.  This context is highly
   relevant since a lot of work within the IETF involves defining
   protocols that can potentially transport (either explicitly or
   implicitly) personal data.

   This document aims to establish a basic lexicon around privacy so
   that IETF contributors who wish to discuss privacy considerations
   within their work can do so using terminology consistent across the
   area.

   Note: This document is discussed at
   https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/ietf-privacy

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference

Hansen, et al.            Expires July 13, 2012                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft             Privacy Terminology              January 2012

   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 13, 2012.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Anonymity  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   3.  Unlinkability  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   4.  Undetectability  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   5.  Pseudonymity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   6.  Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   7.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   8.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
   9.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
     9.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
     9.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Hansen, et al.            Expires July 13, 2012                 [Page 2]
Internet-Draft             Privacy Terminology              January 2012

1.  Introduction

   Privacy is a concept that has been debated and argued throughout the
   last few millennia by all manner of people, including philosophers,
   psychologists, lawyers, and more recently, computer scientists.  Its
   most striking feature is that nobody seems able to agree upon a
   precise definition of what it actually is.  Every individual, every
   group, and every culture have their own different views and
   preconceptions about the concept - some mutually complimentary, some
   distinctly different.  However, it is generally (but not
   unanimously!) agreed that the protection of privacy is "A Good Thing"
   and often, people only realize what it was when they feel that they
   have lost it.
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