Security and Interoperability Implications of Oversized IPv6 Header Chains
draft-ietf-6man-oversized-header-chain-01

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (6man WG)
Authors Fernando Gont  , Vishwas Manral 
Last updated 2012-07-16
Stream IETF
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IPv6 maintenance Working Group (6man)                            F. Gont
Internet-Draft                                    SI6 Networks / UTN-FRH
Updates: 2460 (if approved)                                    V. Manral
Intended status: Standards Track                   Hewlett-Packard Corp.
Expires: January 17, 2013                                  July 16, 2012

  Security and Interoperability Implications of Oversized IPv6 Header
                                 Chains
               draft-ietf-6man-oversized-header-chain-01

Abstract

   The IPv6 specification allows IPv6 header chains of an arbitrary
   size.  The specification also allows options which can in turn extend
   each of the headers.  In those scenarios in which the IPv6 header
   chain or options are unusually long and packets are fragmented, or
   scenarios in which the fragment size is very small, the first
   fragment of a packet may fail to include the entire IPv6 header
   chain.  This document discusses the interoperability and security
   problems of such traffic, and updates RFC 2460 such that the first
   fragment of a packet is required to contain the entire IPv6 header
   chain.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 17, 2013.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents

Gont & Manral           Expires January 17, 2013                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   Implications of Oversized Header Chains       July 2012

   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   3.  Interoperability Implications of Oversized IPv6 Header
       Chains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   4.  Forwarding Implications of Oversized IPv6 Header Chains  . . .  6
   5.  Security Implications of Oversized IPv6 Header Chains  . . . .  7
   6.  Updating RFC 2460  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   7.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   8.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   9.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
     10.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
     10.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

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Internet-Draft   Implications of Oversized Header Chains       July 2012

1.  Introduction

   [RFC2460] allows for an IPv6 header chain of an arbitrary size.  It
   also allows the headers themselves to have options, which can change
   the size of the headers.  In those scenarios in which the IPv6 header
   chain is unusually long and packets are fragmented, or scenarios in
   which the fragment size is very small, the first fragment of a packet
   may fail to include the entire IPv6 header chain.  This document
   discusses the interoperability and security problems of such traffic,
   and updates RFC 2460 such that the first fragment of a fragmented
   datagram is required to contain the entire IPv6 header chain.

   It should be noted that this requirement does not preclude the use of
   e.g.  IPv6 jumbo payloads but instead merely requires that all
   *headers*, starting from IPv6 base header and continuing up to the
   upper layer header (e.g.  TCP or the like) be present in the first
   fragment.

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
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