Home Networking Architecture for IPv6
draft-ietf-homenet-arch-01

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (homenet WG)
Last updated 2012-01-30 (latest revision 2011-12-10)
Replaces draft-chown-homenet-arch
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Network Working Group                                           J. Arkko
Internet-Draft                                                  Ericsson
Intended status: Informational                                 A. Brandt
Expires: August 2, 2012                                    Sigma Designs
                                                                T. Chown
                                               University of Southampton
                                                                 J. Weil
                                                       Time Warner Cable
                                                                O. Troan
                                                     Cisco Systems, Inc.
                                                        January 30, 2012

                 Home Networking Architecture for IPv6
                       draft-ietf-homenet-arch-01

Abstract

   This text describes evolving networking technology within small
   "residential home" networks.  The goal of this memo is to define the
   architecture for IPv6-based home networking and the associated
   principles, considerations and requirements.  The text highlights the
   impact of IPv6 on home networking, illustrates topology scenarios,
   and shows how standard IPv6 mechanisms and addressing can be employed
   in home networking.  The architecture describes the need for specific
   protocol extensions for certain additional functionality.  It is
   assumed that the IPv6 home network is not actively managed, and runs
   as an IPv6-only or dual-stack network.  There are no recommendations
   in this text for the IPv4 part of the network.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on August 2, 2012.

Copyright Notice

Arkko, et al.            Expires August 2, 2012                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft            IPv6 Home Networking              January 2012

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
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   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Arkko, et al.            Expires August 2, 2012                 [Page 2]
Internet-Draft            IPv6 Home Networking              January 2012

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.1.  Terminology and Abbreviations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   2.  Effects of IPv6 on Home Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.1.  Multiple subnets and routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.2.  Multi-Addressing of devices  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     2.3.  Unique Local Addresses (ULAs)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     2.4.  Security, Borders, and the elimination of NAT  . . . . . .  7
     2.5.  Naming, and manual configuration of IP addresses . . . . .  9
   3.  Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     3.1.  Network Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
       3.1.1.  A: Single ISP, Single CER, Single subnet . . . . . . . 10
       3.1.2.  B: Single ISP, Single CER, Multiple subnets  . . . . . 11
       3.1.3.  C: Single ISP, Single CER, Multiple internal
               subnets  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
       3.1.4.  D: Two ISPs, Two CERs, Shared subnets with
               multiple internal routers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       3.1.5.  E: Two ISPs, One CER, Isolated subnets with
               multiple internal routers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       3.1.6.  F: Two ISPs, One CER, Shared subnets with multiple
               internal routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     3.2.  Determining the Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     3.3.  Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
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