Interface to the Routing System Problem Statement
draft-ietf-i2rs-problem-statement-08

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (i2rs WG)
Last updated 2015-12-18
Replaces draft-atlas-i2rs-problem-statement
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Informational
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Network Working Group                                      A. Atlas, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                          Juniper Networks
Intended status: Informational                            T. Nadeau, Ed.
Expires: June 20, 2016                                           Brocade
                                                                 D. Ward
                                                           Cisco Systems
                                                       December 18, 2015

           Interface to the Routing System Problem Statement
                  draft-ietf-i2rs-problem-statement-08

Abstract

   Traditionally, routing systems have implemented routing and signaling
   (e.g.  MPLS) to control traffic forwarding in a network.  Route
   computation has been controlled by relatively static policies that
   define link cost, route cost, or import and export routing policies.
   With the advent of highly dynamic data center networking, on-demand
   WAN services, dynamic policy-driven traffic steering and service
   chaining, the need for real-time security threat responsiveness via
   traffic control, and a paradigm of separating policy-based decision-
   making from the router itself, the need has emerged to more
   dynamically manage and program routing systems in order to control
   routing information and traffic paths and to extract network topology
   information, traffic statistics, and other network analytics from
   routing systems.

   This document proposes meeting this need via an Interface to the
   Routing System (I2RS).

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on June 20, 2016.

Atlas, et al.             Expires June 20, 2016                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft           I2RS Problem Statement            December 2015

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  I2RS Model and Problem Area for the IETF  . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Standard Data-Models of Routing State for Installation  . . .   6
   4.  Learning Router Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Aspects to be Considered for an I2RS Protocol . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   Appendix A.  Existing Management Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

1.  Introduction

   Traditionally, routing systems have implemented routing and signaling
   (e.g.  MPLS) to control traffic forwarding in a network.  Route
   computation has been controlled by relatively static policies that
   define link cost, route cost, or import and export routing policies.
   With the advent of highly dynamic data center networking, on-demand
   WAN services, dynamic policy-driven traffic steering and service
   chaining, the need for real-time security threat responsiveness via
   traffic control, and a paradigm of separating policy-based decision-
   making from the router itself, the need has emerged to more
   dynamically manage and program routing systems in order to control
   routing information and traffic paths and to extract network topology
   information, traffic statistics, and other network analytics from
   routing systems.

   As modern networks continue to grow in scale and complexity and
   desired policy has become more complex and dynamic, there is a need
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