LISP Impact
draft-ietf-lisp-impact-00

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Replaces draft-saucez-lisp-impact
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Network Working Group                                          D. Saucez
Internet-Draft                                                     INRIA
Intended status: Informational                                L. Iannone
Expires: July 12, 2015                                 Telecom ParisTech
                                                             A. Cabellos
                                                                F. Coras
                                       Technical University of Catalonia
                                                         January 8, 2015

                              LISP Impact
                     draft-ietf-lisp-impact-00.txt

Abstract

   The Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol (LISP) aims at improving
   the Internet scalability properties leveraging on three simple
   principles: address role separation, encapsulation, and mapping.  In
   this document, based on implementation, deployment, and theoretical
   studies, we discuss the impact that deployment of LISP can have on
   both the Internet in general and for the end-users in particular.

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  LISP in a nutshell  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  LISP for scaling the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Beyond scaling the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.1.  Traffic engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.2.  LISP for IPv6 Co-existence  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     4.3.  Inter-domain multicast  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  Impact of LISP on operations and business model . . . . . . .   8
     5.1.  Impact on non-LISP traffic and sites  . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.2.  Impact on LISP traffic and sites  . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   8.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15

1.  Introduction

   The Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol (LISP) relies on three
   simple principles to scale the Internet: address role separation,
   encapsulation, and mapping.  The main goal of LISP is to make the
   Internet more scalable by reducing the number of prefixes announced
   in the Default Free Zone (DFZ) as well as its related churn.  As LISP
   relies on mapping and encapsulation, it turns out that it provides
   more benefits than just scalability.  For example, LISP provides a
   mean for a LISP site to precisely control its inter-domain outgoing
   and incoming traffic, with the possibility to apply different
   policies to the different domains exchanging traffic with it.  LISP
   can also be used to ease the transition from IPv4 to IPv6 as it
   allows to transport IPv4 over IPv6 or IPv6 over IPv4.  Furthermore,
   LISP also provides a solution to perform inter-domain multicast.

   This document discusses the impact of LISP's deployment on the
   Internet and on end-users and shows the consequences of the
   interworking infrastructure in path stretch.  There still are many,
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