Terminology for Constrained Node Networks
draft-ietf-lwig-terminology-06

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Last updated 2014-01-30 (latest revision 2013-12-18)
Replaces draft-bormann-lwig-terms
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LWIG Working Group                                            C. Bormann
Internet-Draft                                   Universitaet Bremen TZI
Intended status: Informational                                  M. Ersue
Expires: June 21, 2014                            Nokia Siemens Networks
                                                              A. Keranen
                                                                Ericsson
                                                       December 18, 2013

               Terminology for Constrained Node Networks
                     draft-ietf-lwig-terminology-06

Abstract

   The Internet Protocol Suite is increasingly used on small devices
   with severe constraints on power, memory and processing resources,
   creating constrained node networks.  This document provides a number
   of basic terms that have turned out to be useful in the
   standardization work for constrained node networks.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on June 21, 2014.

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   Copyright (c) 2013 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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Bormann, et al.           Expires June 21, 2014                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft               CNN terminology               December 2013

   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Core Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Constrained Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.2.  Constrained Networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
       2.2.1.  Challenged Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     2.3.  Constrained Node Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
       2.3.1.  LLN ("low-power lossy network") . . . . . . . . . . .   7
       2.3.2.  LoWPAN, 6LoWPAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   3.  Classes of Constrained Devices  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   4.  Power Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     4.1.  Scaling Properties  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     4.2.  Classes of Energy Limitation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     4.3.  Strategies of Using Power for Communication . . . . . . .  11
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   7.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   8.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16

1.  Introduction

   Small devices with limited CPU, memory, and power resources, so
   called constrained devices (often used as a sensor/actuator, a smart
   object, or a smart device) can form a network, becoming "constrained
   nodes" in that network.  Such a network may itself exhibit
   constraints, e.g. with unreliable or lossy channels, limited and
   unpredictable bandwidth, and a highly dynamic topology.

   Constrained devices might be in charge of gathering information in
   diverse settings including natural ecosystems, buildings, and
   factories and sending the information to one or more server stations.
   They also act on information, by performing some physical action,
   including displaying it.  Constrained devices may work under severe
   resource constraints such as limited battery and computing power,
   little memory, as well as insufficient wireless bandwidth and ability
   to communicate; these constraints often exacerbate each other.  Other
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