Latching: Hosted NAT Traversal (HNT) for Media in Real-Time Communication
draft-ietf-mmusic-latching-01

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (mmusic WG)
Last updated 2013-05-07
Replaces draft-ivov-mmusic-latching
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Informational
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Network Working Group                                            E. Ivov
Internet-Draft                                                     Jitsi
Intended status: Informational                                 H. Kaplan
Expires: November 08, 2013                                   Acme Packet
                                                                 D. Wing
                                                                   Cisco
                                                            May 07, 2013

      Latching: Hosted NAT Traversal (HNT) for Media in Real-Time
                             Communication
                     draft-ietf-mmusic-latching-01

Abstract

   This document describes behavior of signalling intermediaries in
   Real-Time Communication (RTC) deployments, sometimes referred to as
   Session Border Controllers (SBCs), when performing Hosted NAT
   Traversal (HNT).  HNT is a set of mechanisms, such as media relaying
   and latching, that such intermediaries use to enable other RTC
   devices behind NATs to communicate with each other.  This document is
   non-normative, and is only written to explain HNT in order to provide
   a reference to the IETF community, as well as an informative
   description to manufacturers, and users.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on November 08, 2013.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2013 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

Ivov, et al.           Expires November 08, 2013                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   Hosted NAT Traversal for Media in RTC          May 2013

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Background  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Impact on Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Media Behavior, Latching  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   7.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14

1.  Introduction

   Network Address Translators (NATs) are widely used in the Internet by
   consumers and organizations.  Although specific NAT behaviors vary,
   this document uses the term "NAT" for devices that map any IPv4 or
   IPv6 address and transport port number to another IPv4 or IPv6
   address and transport port number.  This includes consumer NATs,
   Firewall-NATs, IPv4-IPv6 NATs, Carrier-Grade NATs, etc.

   Protocols like SIP [RFC3261], and others that try to use a more
   direct path for media than with signalling, are difficult to use
   across NATs.  They use IP addresses and transport port numbers
   encoded in bodies such as SDP [RFC4566] as well as, in the case of
   SIP, various header fields.  Such addresses and ports are unusable
   unless all peers in a session are located behind the same NAT.

   Mechanisms such as Session Traversal Utilities for NAT (STUN)
   [RFC5389], Traversal Using Relays around NAT (TURN) [RFC5766], and
   Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) [RFC5245] did not exist
   when protocols like SIP began being deployed.  Session Border
   Controllers (SBCs) that were already being used by SIP domains for
   other SIP and media-related purposes began to use proprietary
   mechanisms to enable SIP devices behind NATs to communicate across
   the NATs.
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