Service Models Explained
draft-ietf-opsawg-service-model-explained-05

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (opsawg WG)
Last updated 2017-11-13 (latest revision 2017-10-12)
Replaces draft-wu-opsawg-service-model-explained
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Send notices to Tianran Zhou <zhoutianran@huawei.com>
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OPS Area Working Group                                             Q. Wu
Internet-Draft                                                    W. Liu
Intended status: Informational                       Huawei Technologies
Expires: April 15, 2018                                        A. Farrel
                                                        Juniper Networks
                                                        October 12, 2017

                        Service Models Explained
              draft-ietf-opsawg-service-model-explained-05

Abstract

   The IETF has produced many modules in the YANG modeling language.
   The majority of these modules are used to construct data models to
   model devices or monolithic functions.

   A small number of YANG modules have been defined to model services
   (for example, the Layer Three Virtual Private Network Service Model
   produced by the L3SM working group and documented in RFC 8049).

   This document describes service models as used within the IETF, and
   also shows where a service model might fit into a Software Defined
   Networking architecture.  Note that service models do not make any
   assumption of how a service is actually engineered and delivered for
   a customer; details of how network protocols and devices are
   engineered to deliver a service are captured in other modules that
   are not exposed through the Customer-Provider Interface.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 15, 2018.

Wu, et al.               Expires April 15, 2018                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft          Service Models Explained            October 2017

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terms and Concepts  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Using Service Models  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.1.  Practical Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   4.  Service Models in an SDN Context  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  Possible Causes of Confusion  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   6.  Comparison With Other Work  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     6.1.  Comparison With Network Service Models  . . . . . . . . .  13
     6.2.  Service Delivery and Network Element Model Work . . . . .  15
     6.3.  Customer Service Model Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     6.4.  The MEF Architecture  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   7.  Further Concepts  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
     7.1.  Technology Agnostic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
     7.2.  Relationship to Policy  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
     7.3.  Operator-Specific Features  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
     7.4.  Supporting Multiple Services  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   9.  Manageability Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   10. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   11. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   12. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
     12.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
     12.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23

1.  Introduction

   In recent years the number of modules written in the YANG modeling
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