Policy Framework Definition Language
draft-ietf-policy-framework-pfdl-00

Document Type Expired Internet-Draft (policy WG)
Authors John Strassner  , Stephen Schleimer 
Last updated 1998-11-23
Stream Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
Intended RFC status (None)
Formats
Expired & archived
plain text pdf htmlized bibtex
Stream WG state WG Document
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state Expired
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
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This Internet-Draft is no longer active. A copy of the expired Internet-Draft can be found at
https://www.ietf.org/archive/id/draft-ietf-policy-framework-pfdl-00.txt

Abstract

Recently, the IETF has developed protocols that classify packets in order to treat certain classes or flows of packets in a particular way compared to other classes or flows of packets. The successful wide-scale deployment of these protocols depends on the ability to administer and distribute consistent policy information to different types of network devices as well as hosts and servers that participate in policy decision making, administration, distribution and control. There is a clear need to develop a scalable framework for policy administration and distribution that will enable interoperability among multiple devices and device types that must work together to achieve a consistent implementation of policy. This document defines a language, called the Policy Framework Definition Language (PFDL), that maps requirements for services to be provided by the network as defined in a business specification (e.g., an SLA) to a common vendor- and device-independent intermediate form. This enables policy information and specifications to be shared among the heterogeneous components that comprise the policy framework, and allows multiple vendors to use multiple devices to implement that framework. The PFDL is the common 'currency' that is exchanged between these heterogeneous components to enable them all to perform their function in providing, securing, distributing, and administering policy. The PFDL becomes the way to ensure that multiple vendors interpret the policy the same way while enabling vendors to provide value-added services.

Authors

John Strassner (john.strassner@intelliden.com)
Stephen Schleimer (sschlmr@cisco.com)

(Note: The e-mail addresses provided for the authors of this Internet-Draft may no longer be valid.)