WebRTC IP Address Handling Requirements
draft-ietf-rtcweb-ip-handling-03

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (rtcweb WG)
Last updated 2017-04-07 (latest revision 2017-01-14)
Replaces draft-shieh-rtcweb-ip-handling
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Proposed Standard
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Document shepherd Sean Turner
IESG IESG state I-D Exists
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Send notices to Sean Turner <sean@sn3rd.com>
Network Working Group                                          J. Uberti
Internet-Draft                                                  G. Shieh
Intended status: Standards Track                                  Google
Expires: July 18, 2017                                  January 14, 2017

                WebRTC IP Address Handling Requirements
                    draft-ietf-rtcweb-ip-handling-03

Abstract

   This document provides information and requirements for how IP
   addresses should be handled by WebRTC applications.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 18, 2017.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   3.  Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Detailed Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  Application Guidance  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   6.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   9.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Appendix A.  Change log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   As a technology that supports peer-to-peer connections, WebRTC may
   send data over different network paths than the path used for HTTP
   traffic.  This may allow a web application to learn additional
   information about the user, which may be problematic in certain
   cases.  This document summarizes the concerns, and makes
   recommendations on how best to handle the tradeoff between privacy
   and media performance.

2.  Problem Statement

   WebRTC enables real-time peer-to-peer communications by enumerating
   network interfaces and discovering the best route through the ICE
   [RFC5245]protocol.  During the ICE process, the peers involved in a
   session gather and exchange all the IP addresses they can discover,
   so that the connectivity of each IP pair can be checked, and the best
   path chosen.  The addresses that are gathered usually consist of an
   endpoint's private physical/virtual addresses, and its public
   Internet addresses.

   These addresses are exposed upwards to the web application, so that
   they can be communicated to the remote endpoint.  This allows the
   application to learn more about the local network configuration than
   it would from a typical HTTP scenario, in which the web server would
   only see a single public Internet address, i.e. the address from
   which the HTTP request was sent.

   The information revealed falls into three categories:

   1.  If the client is behind a NAT, the client's private IP addresses,
       typically [RFC1918]addresses, can be learned.

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   2.  If the client tries to hide its physical location through a VPN,
       and the VPN and local OS support routing over multiple interfaces
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