Enterprise IPv6 Deployment Guidelines
draft-ietf-v6ops-enterprise-incremental-ipv6-05

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (v6ops WG)
Last updated 2014-06-26 (latest revision 2014-01-12)
Replaces draft-chkpvc-enterprise-incremental-ipv6
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Informational
Formats plain text pdf html bibtex
Stream WG state Submitted to IESG for Publication
Document shepherd Fred Baker
Shepherd write-up Show (last changed 2014-05-15)
IESG IESG state Approved-announcement to be sent::Revised I-D Needed
Consensus Boilerplate Yes
Telechat date
Responsible AD Joel Jaeggli
Send notices to v6ops-chairs@tools.ietf.org, draft-ietf-v6ops-enterprise-incremental-ipv6@tools.ietf.org, John_Brzozowski@Cable.Comcast.com
IANA IANA review state IANA OK - No Actions Needed
IANA action state None
Network Working Group                                    K. Chittimaneni
Internet-Draft                                               Google Inc.
Intended status: Informational                                  T. Chown
Expires: July 16, 2014                         University of Southampton
                                                               L. Howard
                                                       Time Warner Cable
                                                            V. Kuarsingh
                                                                 Dyn Inc
                                                             Y. Pouffary
                                                         Hewlett Packard
                                                               E. Vyncke
                                                           Cisco Systems
                                                        January 12, 2014

                 Enterprise IPv6 Deployment Guidelines
            draft-ietf-v6ops-enterprise-incremental-ipv6-05

Abstract

   Enterprise network administrators worldwide are in various stages of
   preparing for or deploying IPv6 into their networks.  The
   administrators face different challenges than operators of Internet
   access providers, and have reasons for different priorities.  The
   overall problem for many administrators will be to offer Internet-
   facing services over IPv6, while continuing to support IPv4, and
   while introducing IPv6 access within the enterprise IT network.  The
   overall transition will take most networks from an IPv4-only
   environment to a dual stack network environment and eventually an
   IPv6-only operating mode.  This document helps provide a framework
   for enterprise network architects or administrators who may be faced
   with many of these challenges as they consider their IPv6 support
   strategies.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

Chittimaneni, et al.      Expires July 16, 2014                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft         Enterprise IPv6 Deployment           January 2014

   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 16, 2014.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Enterprise Assumptions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.2.  IPv4-only Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.3.  Reasons for a Phased Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.  Preparation and Assessment Phase  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     2.1.  Program Planning  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     2.2.  Inventory Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       2.2.1.  Network infrastructure readiness assessment . . . . .   8
       2.2.2.  Applications readiness assessment . . . . . . . . . .   8
       2.2.3.  Importance of readiness validation and testing  . . .   9
     2.3.  Training  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     2.4.  Security Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
       2.4.1.  IPv6 is no more secure than IPv4  . . . . . . . . . .  10
       2.4.2.  Similarities between IPv6 and IPv4 security . . . . .  11
       2.4.3.  Specific Security Issues for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . .  11
     2.5.  Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     2.6.  Address Plan  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     2.7.  Tools Assessment  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
   3.  External Phase  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
     3.1.  Connectivity  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
     3.2.  Security  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
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