Considerations for Transitioning Content to IPv6
draft-ietf-v6ops-v6-aaaa-whitelisting-implications-10

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (v6ops WG)
Last updated 2012-02-16 (latest revision 2011-11-22)
Replaces draft-livingood-dns-whitelisting-implications
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Informational
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IESG IESG state Approved-announcement to be sent::Point Raised - writeup needed
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Responsible AD Ron Bonica
IESG note Joel Jaeggli (joelja@bogus.com) is the document shepherd.
Send notices to v6ops-chairs@tools.ietf.org, draft-ietf-v6ops-v6-aaaa-whitelisting-implications@tools.ietf.org
IPv6 Operations                                             J. Livingood
Internet-Draft                                                   Comcast
Intended status: Informational                         February 23, 2012
Expires: August 26, 2012

            Considerations for Transitioning Content to IPv6
         draft-ietf-v6ops-v6-aaaa-whitelisting-implications-10

Abstract

   This document describes considerations for the transition of end user
   content on the Internet to IPv6.  While this is tailored to address
   end user content, which is typically web-based, many aspects of this
   document may be more broadly applicable to the transition to IPv6 of
   other applications and services.  This document explores the
   challenges involved in the transition to IPv6, potential migration
   tactics, possible migration phases, and other considerations.  The
   audience for this document is the Internet community generally,
   particularly IPv6 implementers.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on August 26, 2012.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect

Livingood                Expires August 26, 2012                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        Transitioning Content to IPv6        February 2012

   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   2.  Challenges When Transitioning Content to IPv6  . . . . . . . .  4
     2.1.  IPv6-Related Impairment  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.2.  Operational Maturity Concerns  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.3.  Volume-Based Concerns  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   3.  IPv6 Adoption Implications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   4.  Potential Migration Tactics  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     4.1.  Solve Current End User IPv6 Impairments  . . . . . . . . .  7
     4.2.  Use IPv6-Specicic Names  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     4.3.  Implement DNS Resolver Whitelisting  . . . . . . . . . . .  8
       4.3.1.  How DNS Resolver Whitelisting Works  . . . . . . . . . 10
       4.3.2.  Similarities to Content Delivery Networks and
               Global Server Load Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       4.3.3.  Similarities to DNS Load Balancing . . . . . . . . . . 15
       4.3.4.  Similarities to Split DNS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       4.3.5.  Related Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     4.4.  Implement DNS Blacklisting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     4.5.  Transition Directly to Native Dual Stack . . . . . . . . . 18
   5.  Potential Implementation Phases  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     5.1.  No Access to IPv6 Content  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     5.2.  Using IPv6-Specific Names  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     5.3.  Deploying DNS Resolver Whitelisting Using Manual
           Processes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     5.4.  Deploying DNS Resolver Whitelisting Using Automated
           Processes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     5.5.  Turning Off DNS Resolver Whitelisting  . . . . . . . . . . 19
     5.6.  Deploying DNS Blacklisting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
     5.7.  Fully Dual-Stack Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
   6.  Other Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
     6.1.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
     6.2.  Privacy Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
     6.3.  Considerations with Poor IPv4 and Good IPv6 Transport  . . 22
     6.4.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
   7.  Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
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