Flexible IP: An Adaptable IP Address Structure
draft-jia-flex-ip-address-structure-00

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Authors Yihao Jia  , Zhe Chen  , Sheng Jiang 
Last updated 2020-10-31
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Network Working Group                                             Y. Jia
Internet-Draft                                                   Z. Chen
Intended status: Standards Track                                S. Jiang
Expires: 4 May 2021                                               Huawei
                                                         31 October 2020

             Flexible IP: An Adaptable IP Address Structure
                 draft-jia-flex-ip-address-structure-00

Abstract

   Along as the popularization and adoption of IP in emerging scenarios,
   challenges emerge as well due to the ossified address structure.  To
   enable TCP/IP in networks that previously using exclusive protocol, a
   flexible address structure would be far more preferred for their
   particular properties
   [draft-jia-scenarios-flexible-address-structure].

   This document describes a flexible address structure -- Flexible IP
   (FlexIP) acting on limited domains [RFC8799].  FlexIP is expected to
   proactively adapt scenarios under flexible address structure.
   Meanwhile, FlexIP still benefit from global reachability based on the
   IPv6 interoperability.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on 4 May 2021.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2020 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

Jia, et al.                Expires 4 May 2021                   [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                   FlexIP                     October 2020

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents (https://trustee.ietf.org/
   license-info) in effect on the date of publication of this document.
   Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Targeted Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Design Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.1.  Multi-Semantics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.2.  Elastic Address Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.3.  Scalability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.4.  Interoperability  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  FlexIP Address structure  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.1.  Restrained Space Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.2.  Extendable Space Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.3.  Hierarchical Segments Format  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.4.  Multi-Semantics Format  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   6.  FlexIP Address Text Representation  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   7.  Interoperability  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   9.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   10. Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14

1.  Introduction

   As Internet Protocol (IP) gradually turned into the "waist" of the
   "TCP/IP" protocol stack, it is considered to be the core pillar of
   the entire Internet [waist].  Although numerous technologies in this
   "TCP/IP" protocol stack have emerged, evolved, or obsoleted by
   others, the IPv6 technology [RFC8200] is the only forward in network
   layer along with the Internet upgrades.  IPv6, as the unique
   successor of IPv4 [RFC0791] defined by IETF, fixes defects for most
   of its parts.  Most notably, the address space is enormously expanded
   from 32-bit to 128-bit in IPv6 reformation.  Despite that IPv6 is
   expected to serve almost infinite devices in the foreseeable future,
   several scenarios are found in trouble when IPv6 is in use.

   For instance, due to the market and cost requirements, numerous
   Internet-of-things (IoTs) are devised to be tiny and resource
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