Setting up a SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) connection in a dual stack network using connection oriented transports
draft-johansson-sip-he-connection-01

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SIPCORE                                                     O. Johansson
Internet-Draft                                                 Edvina AB
Intended status: Standards Track                            G. Salgueiro
Expires: April 24, 2017                                    Cisco Systems
                                                               D. Worley
                                                                 Ariadne
                                                        October 21, 2016

  Setting up a SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) connection in a dual
           stack network using connection oriented transports
                  draft-johansson-sip-he-connection-01

Abstract

   The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) supports multiple transports
   running both over IPv4 and IPv6 protocols.  In more and more cases, a
   SIP user agent (UA) is connected to multiple network interfaces.  In
   these cases setting up a connection from a dual stack client to a
   dual stack server may suffer from the issues described in RFC 6555
   [RFC6555] - Happy Eyeballs - significant delays in the process of
   setting up a working flow to a server.  This negatively affects user
   experience.

   This document builds on RFC 6555 and explains how a RFC3261 [RFC3261]
   compliant SIP implementation can quickly set up working flows to a
   given hostname (located by using DNS NAPTR and SRV lookups) in a dual
   stack network using connection oriented transport protocols.  A
   solution for connectionless transport protocols is discussed in a
   separate document.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
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   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 24, 2017.

Johansson, et al.        Expires April 24, 2017                 [Page 1]
Internet-DrafSIP Happy Eyeballs - connection-oriented trans October 2016

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology and Conventions Used in This Document . . . . . .   3
   3.  Background: DNS Procedures in a Dual-Stack Network  . . . . .   4
   4.  Setting up the connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   7.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5

1.  Introduction

   The core SIP [RFC3261] RFCs were written with support for both IPv4
   and IPv6 in mind, but they were not fully equipped to handle highly
   hybridized environments during this transitional phase of migration
   from IPv4 to IPv6 networks, where many server and client
   implementations run on dual stack hosts.  In such environments, a
   dual-stack host will likely suffer greater connection delay, and by
   extension an inferior user experience, than an IPv4-only host.  The
   need to remedy this diminished performance of dual-stack hosts led to
   the development of the Happy Eyeballs [RFC6555] algorithm, that has
   since been implemented in many applications.

   This document updates RFC 3261[RFC3261] procedures so that a dual-
   stack client using connection oriented transport SHOULD set up
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