Webfinger
draft-jones-appsawg-webfinger-00

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Last updated 2011-10-23
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Network Working Group                                      Paul E. Jones
Internet Draft                                         Gonzalo Salgueiro
Intended status: Standards Track                           Cisco Systems
Expires: April 23, 2012                                     Joseph Smarr
                                                                  Google
                                                        October 23, 2011

                                 Webfinger
                   draft-jones-appsawg-webfinger-00.txt

Abstract

   This specification defines procedures for discovering information
   about people.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 23, 2012.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2011 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors. All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Jones, et al.           Expires April 23, 2012                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                Webfinger                     October 2011

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction...................................................2
   2. Terminology....................................................3
   3. Example Uses of Webfinger......................................3
      3.1. Locating a User's Blog....................................3
      3.2. Populating an Electronic Address Book.....................3
      3.3. Simplifying the Login Process.............................4
   4. The Webfinger Protocol.........................................4
      4.1. The acct URI Scheme.......................................4
      4.2. Performing a Webfinger Query..............................5
   5. Support for the JSON Resource Descriptor (JRD).................6
   6. Support for Cross-Origin Resource Sharing......................7
   7. Security Considerations........................................7
   8. IANA Considerations............................................7
   9. Acknowledgments................................................8
   10. References....................................................8
      10.1. Normative References.....................................8
      10.2. Informative References...................................9
   Author's Addresses................................................9

1. Introduction

   There is a utility found on UNIX systems called "finger" [10] that
   allows a person to access information about another person.  The
   information being queried might be on a computer anywhere in the
   world.  The information returned via "finger" is simply a plain text
   file that contains unstructured information provided by the queried
   user.

   The "finger" protocol failed to be adopted by most users on the
   Internet primarily for two reasons.  First, few users have an account
   on a system that supports the "finger" protocol.  Even if one's email
   provider enabled the "finger" service, the information conveyed is
   substantially less rich and valuable than what might be conveyed on a
   personal homepage, blog, or social network site.  Thus, there has
   been no motivation on the part of service providers to provide the
   service.  Second, the information conveyed is entirely unstructured
   and not useful for automated processes.  As such, there is little
   value to web programmers who might wish to use this information.

   Webfinger does not try to improve on the legacy "finger" by allowing
   users to provide rich content, at least not directly.  Rather,
   Webfinger focuses on making information available to automated
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