A Procedure for Cautious Delegation of a DNS Name
draft-kolkman-cautious-delegation-00

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Authors Olaf Kolkman  , Andrew Sullivan 
Last updated 2013-05-02
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Network Working Group                                         O. Kolkman
Internet-Draft                                                NLnet Labs
Intended status: Informational                               A. Sullivan
Expires: November 3, 2013                                      Dyn, Inc.
                                                             May 2, 2013

           A Procedure for Cautious Delegation of a DNS Name
                  draft-kolkman-cautious-delegation-00

Abstract

   Sometimes, a DNS name is known to be in use in the wild even though
   it was never properly delegated.  This situation appears
   particularly, but not only, true in certain domains near the root of
   the tree: people have independently used those non-existent top-level
   domains as private namespaces.  If those names are to be delegated in
   the public DNS, prudence demands that collisions between the private
   uses and the public use be minimized.  At the same time, the public
   use should not be prohibited on the grounds of what is, after all,
   "hijacking" of a name space.  We outline a procedure to minimize harm
   while permitting delegation to proceed.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on November 3, 2013.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2013 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of

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   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Background and Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   2.  terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   3.  Predelegation determination of use of a name  . . . . . . . . . 4
     3.1.  Predelegation testing is needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
     3.2.  Determining the names of concern  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
       3.2.1.  Mode 1: prior to any delegation . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
       3.2.2.  Mode 2: After delegation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   4.  Parameters for operation of this procedure  . . . . . . . . . . 6
     4.1.  Median or Mean  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
     4.2.  Discussion of Alternatives  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
     4.3.  Security considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
   5.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   Appendix A.  Document Editing Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
     A.1.  version 00  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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1.  Background and Introduction

   DNS names have always co-existed with other namespaces that are
   virtually indistinguishable from the DNS.  The DNS was itself
   deployed alongside the host ### table.  NetBIOS ### names, though
   only one label long, could always interact with the DNS search path
   mechanism to generate DNS names.  Additinally, mDNS [RFC6762] names
   look just like DNS names.  Because different naming systems are
   usually linked together in the user interface, from an end user's
   point of view these name spaces are all one -- even though they
   function differently on the Internet.

   While [RFC6761] reserved certain special names for private use, there
   is evidence [SAC45] that various sites connected to the Internet have
   used other names for internal purposes.  In fact, [RFC6762] advises
   not to use .local for private use and observes: "the following top-
   level domains have been used on private internal networks without the
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