Layer 2 Virtual Private Networks Using BGP for Auto-discovery and Signaling
draft-kompella-l2vpn-l2vpn-09

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual in rtg area)
Last updated 2012-01-19 (latest revision 2012-01-13)
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Responsible AD Stewart Bryant
IESG note Ross Callon (rcallon@juniper.net) is the document shepherd.
Send notices to kireeti@juniper.net, bhupesh@cisco.com, cherukuri@juniper.net, draft-kompella-l2vpn-l2vpn@tools.ietf.org, rcallon@juniper.net
Network Working Group                                        K. Kompella
Internet-Draft                                          Juniper Networks
Intended status: Informational                                B. Kothari
Expires: July 17, 2012                                     Cisco Systems
                                                            R. Cherukuri
                                                        Juniper Networks
                                                        January 14, 2012

   Layer 2 Virtual Private Networks Using BGP for Auto-discovery and
                               Signaling
                   draft-kompella-l2vpn-l2vpn-09.txt

Abstract

   Layer 2 Virtual Private Networks (L2VPNs) based on Frame Relay or ATM
   circuits have been around a long time; more recently, Ethernet VPNs,
   including Virtual Private LAN Service, have become popular.
   Traditional L2VPNs often required a separate Service Provider
   infrastructure for each type, and yet another for the Internet and IP
   VPNs.  In addition, L2VPN provisioning was cumbersome.  This document
   presents a new approach to the problem of offering L2VPN services
   where the L2VPN customer's experience is virtually identical to that
   offered by traditional Layer 2 VPNs, but such that a Service Provider
   can maintain a single network for L2VPNs, IP VPNs and the Internet,
   as well as a common provisioning methodology for all services.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 17, 2012.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

Kompella, et al.          Expires July 17, 2012                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft  BGP Autodiscovery and Signaling for L2VPN   January 2012

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Kompella, et al.          Expires July 17, 2012                 [Page 2]
Internet-Draft  BGP Autodiscovery and Signaling for L2VPN   January 2012

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.1.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     1.2.  Advantages of Layer 2 VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
       1.2.1.  Separation of Administrative Responsibilities  . . . .  6
       1.2.2.  Migrating from Traditional Layer 2 VPNs  . . . . . . .  7
       1.2.3.  Privacy of Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
       1.2.4.  Layer 3 Independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
       1.2.5.  PE Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
       1.2.6.  Ease of Configuration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     1.3.  Advantages of Layer 3 VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
       1.3.1.  Layer 2 Independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
       1.3.2.  SP Routing as Added Value  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
       1.3.3.  Class-of-Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     1.4.  Multicast Routing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     1.5.  Conventions used in this document  . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   2.  Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   3.  Operation of a Layer 2 VPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     3.1.  Network Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     3.2.  Configuration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       3.2.1.  CE Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       3.2.2.  PE Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
       3.2.3.  Adding a New Site  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
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