The ARK Identifier Scheme
draft-kunze-ark-24

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Authors John Kunze  , Emmanuelle Berm├Ęs 
Last updated 2020-06-21
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Network Working Group                                           J. Kunze
Internet-Draft                                California Digital Library
Intended status: Informational                                 E. Bermes
Expires: December 23, 2020              Bibliotheque nationale de France
                                                           June 21, 2020

                       The ARK Identifier Scheme
                           draft-kunze-ark-24

Abstract

   The ARK (Archival Resource Key) naming scheme is designed to
   facilitate the high-quality and persistent identification of
   information objects.  A founding principle of the ARK is that
   persistence is purely a matter of service and is neither inherent in
   an object nor conferred on it by a particular naming syntax.  The
   best that an identifier can do is to lead users to the services that
   support robust reference.  The term ARK itself refers both to the
   scheme and to any single identifier that conforms to it.  An ARK has
   five components:

   [https://NMA/]ark:[/]NAAN/Name[Qualifier]

   an optional and mutable Name Mapping Authority (usually a hostname),
   the "ark:" label, the Name Assigning Authority Number (NAAN), the
   assigned Name, and an optional and possibly mutable Qualifier
   supported by the NMA.  The NAAN and Name together form the immutable
   persistent identifier for the object independent of the URL hostname.
   An ARK is a special kind of URL that connects users to three things:
   the named object, its metadata, and the provider's promise about its
   persistence.  When entered into the location field of a Web browser,
   the ARK leads the user to the named object.  That same ARK, inflected
   by appending `?info', returns a metadata record that is both human-
   and machine-readable.  The returned record contains core metadata and
   a commitment statement from the current provider.  Tools exist for
   minting, binding, and resolving ARKs.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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Kunze & Bermes          Expires December 23, 2020               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                     ARK                         June 2020

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 23, 2020.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2020 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Reasons to Use ARKs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.2.  Three Requirements of ARKs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     1.3.  Organizing Support for ARKs:  Our Stuff vs. Their Stuff .   6
     1.4.  Definition of Identifier  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   2.  ARK Anatomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     2.1.  The Name Mapping Authority (NMA)  . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     2.2.  The ARK Label Part (ark:) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     2.3.  The Name Assigning Authority Number (NAAN)  . . . . . . .  11
     2.4.  The Name Part . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     2.5.  The Qualifier Part  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
       2.5.1.  ARKs that Reveal Object Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . .  14
       2.5.2.  ARKs that Reveal Object Variants  . . . . . . . . . .  15
     2.6.  Character Repertoires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
     2.7.  Normalization and Lexical Equivalence . . . . . . . . . .  17
   3.  Naming Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
     3.1.  ARKS Embedded in Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
     3.2.  Objects Should Wear Their Identifiers . . . . . . . . . .  19
     3.3.  Names are Political, not Technological  . . . . . . . . .  20
     3.4.  Choosing a Hostname or NMA  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
     3.5.  Assigners of ARKs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
     3.6.  NAAN Namespace Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
     3.7.  Sub-Object Naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
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