Controller Identification Extension for MUD
draft-lear-opsawg-mud-controller-candidates-00

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Network Working Group                                            E. Lear
Internet-Draft                                             Cisco Systems
Intended status: Standards Track                           July 01, 2019
Expires: January 2, 2020

              Controller Identification Extension for MUD
             draft-lear-opsawg-mud-controller-candidates-00

Abstract

   Manufacturer Usage Descriptions (MUD) are a means by which devices
   can establish expectations about how they are intended to behave, and
   how the network should treat them.  This extension provides a means
   for a MUD controller to identify itself through its own MUD file.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 2, 2020.

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   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

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Lear                     Expires January 2, 2020                [Page 1]
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  The ietf-mud-controller model extension . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  The controller-candidate augmentation to the MUD YANG
           model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Examples  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Appendix A.  Changes from Earlier Versions  . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   Manufacturer Usage Descriptions (MUD) [RFC8520] provides a means for
   devices to identify what they are and what sort of network access
   they need.  Two abstractions made available in that specification are
   "controller" and "my-controller".  As initially specified, these
   devices must be identfied by the network administrator.  To simplify
   the administrator's life, a means of identifying devices that are
   candidates to be a controller for another device is desirable.

   This memo specifies an extension that makes use of the MUD file of
   the controller itself.  It also sets the groundwork to create a
   RESTful interface for applications that are serving as controllers to
   make use of the same grouping.  However, that work is left either for
   a future version of this draft, or a future specification.

   For example, a light switch might identify as a candidate controller
   for luminaires.  A thermostat might identify as a controller for an
   air conditioner or heater.

   To address the case where "my-controller" is used, the manufacturer
   of a candidate controller must list the MUD URLs of devices that it
   knows it can serve.  For example, if thermostat manufacturer "Example
   Thermostat, Inc" knows that it can properly control a heater made by
   "Example Heating, Inc", and the heater has a mud url of
   "https://heating.example.com/mudurls/heater1000.json", the thermostat
   would list that or an expression matching that URL in its MUD URL.
   The heater's MUD file would be expected to contain a "my-controller"
   statement in order for this controller to be considered a candidate.

   To address the case where "controller" is used, then the class
   indicated by the controller must be named instead of a MUD URL.  In
   our previous example, let us assume that the heater1000.json file
   contains a "controller" statement with a class URI of
   "https://heating.example.com/theromstats".  In this case, the

Lear                     Expires January 2, 2020                [Page 2]
Internet-Draft                   MUD QoS                       July 2019
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