Service Function Chaining Applicability in Industrial Edge Computing
draft-liu-iiot-sfc-edge-computing-applicability-00

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Industrial Internet of Things                                     B. Liu
Internet-Draft                                               K. Katsalis
Intended status: Informational                                  M. Zhang
Expires: April 24, 2019                              Huawei Technologies
                                                        October 21, 2018

  Service Function Chaining Applicability in Industrial Edge Computing
           draft-liu-iiot-sfc-edge-computing-applicability-00

Abstract

   Decoupling functions from the industrial hardware enables diverse,
   migratable, cross-industry replicable applications to be deployed
   with flexibility at the edge and on the cloud.  Users should be free
   to adjust their business policies in industrial IoT and with low
   cost.  Therefore efficient and dynamic orchestration of the
   applications is critical.  This document describes several use cases
   that demonstrate the applicability of Service Function Chaining in
   industrial edge computing to organize the applications and provides
   extra requirements to support this applicability.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 24, 2019.

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   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   publication of this document.  Please review these documents

Liu, et al.              Expires April 24, 2019                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft      SFC in Industrial Edge Computing        October 2018

   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Industrial Edge Computing Overview  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Function Deployment Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.1.  Node Capability Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.2.  Performance Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     4.3.  Privacy Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  SFC for Edge Computing use case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.1.  Building paths from chains  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.2.  Selecting a path  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     5.3.  Path redirection  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   6.  Applicability Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12

1.  Introduction

   Cloudification has become a consensus trend in many domains due to
   the low cost, high scalability and reliability of the cloud.
   However, cloudification may not be easy or applicable for all aspects
   of industrial internet of things.  In order to achieve control
   stability, an input must be given to the system with a bounded
   latency.  For example, the control loop of a robotic arm can be 10ms,
   in which time the system must acquire the sensors' signals, compute
   the input and send it to the actuators.  Deploying the controller
   remotely on the cloud is not practical because the round trip of
   signals is too time consuming, and packet loss will lead to
   instability.  Besides, transmitting all the raw data to the cloud is
   not economical: VPNs or reserved bandwidth needs much more
   expenditure.  In addition, industrial data is so sensitive that the
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