Openv6 Architecture for IPv6 Deployment
draft-liu-openv6-architecture-00

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Authors Will LIU  , Cathy Zhou  , Qiong Sun 
Last updated 2013-10-21
Stream (None)
Intended RFC status (None)
Formats pdf htmlized (tools) htmlized bibtex
Stream Stream state (No stream defined)
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
RFC Editor Note (None)
IESG IESG state I-D Exists
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Network Working Group                                             W. Liu
Internet-Draft                                                   C. Zhou
Intended status: Informational                       Huawei Technologies
Expires: April 24, 2014                                           Q. Sun
                                                           China Telecom
                                                        October 21, 2013

                Openv6 Architecture for IPv6 Deployment
                    draft-liu-openv6-architecture-00

Abstract

   IPv6 transition leads to costly end-to-end network upgrades and poses
   new challenges in terms of device management with a variety of
   transitional protocols.

   This document provides a cost-effective and flexible unified IPv6
   deployment by describing an architecture of a standard and
   programmatic manner for IPv6 deployment.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 24, 2014.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2013 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect

Liu, et al.              Expires April 24, 2014                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   Openv6 Architecture for IPv6 Deployment    October 2013

   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   3.  Motivation for OpenV6 Architecture  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Overview of the OpenV6 Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   5.  OpenV6 Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  Manageability Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   9.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   10. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     10.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     10.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   The exhaustion of the IPv4 address space has been a practical problem
   that network carriers are facing today.  Existing solutions such as
   IPv4 re-addressing and address reusing fail to fundamentally solve
   this problem.  Instead, IPv6 is regarded as a complete and thorough
   solution to this problem.

   To date, the adoption of IPv6 is progressing slowly.
   [Google-IPv6-Statistics] shows the statistics of IPv6 adoption.  On
   one hand, IPv6 lacks support from applications.  As a result, end
   users are reluctant to transition to IPv6 due to lack of attractive
   applications and competitive prices on IPv6.  On the other hand, a
   large-scale IPv6 network as well as a stable and large IPv6 user
   group are the fundamental driving forces for evolving to IPv6.

   The key to the above deadlock is that network carriers should take
   the initiative in constructing and developing an IPv6-friendly
   infrastructure, thus providing IPv6-based service access capabilities
   and actively nurturing the IPv6 adoption.  The Openv6 and this
   document are focused on flexibly unifying the IPv6 transition
   mechanisms.  The Openv6 provides an IPv6-friendly infrastructure to
   let the users decide for themselves when and how to start the IPv6
   transition.

2.  Terminology

Liu, et al.              Expires April 24, 2014                 [Page 2]
Internet-Draft   Openv6 Architecture for IPv6 Deployment    October 2013

3.  Motivation for OpenV6 Architecture

   Several motivations for the Openv6 are listed below.  This list is
Show full document text