HIP Enabled ID/Loc separation for fast 5GPP IP mobility
draft-moskowitz-hip-based-5gpp-ip-mobility-01

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HIP                                                         R. Moskowitz
Internet-Draft                                                     X. Xu
Intended status: Standards Track                                  B. Liu
Expires: April 30, 2017                                           Huawei
                                                        October 27, 2016

        HIP Enabled ID/Loc separation for fast 5GPP IP mobility
           draft-moskowitz-hip-based-5gpp-ip-mobility-01.txt

Abstract

   HIP [RFC7401] stands alone in providing a secure Endpoint ID for
   decoupling the Internetworking and Transport protocol layers.  The
   addition of a secure rendezvous service to facilitate mobility will
   form the cornerstones for this 5GPP mobility technology.  This
   document will describe complete mobility environment and the
   additional components needed.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 30, 2017.

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Moskowitz, et al.        Expires April 30, 2017                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        HIP enabled 5GPP IP Mobility          October 2016

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terms and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Requirements Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  The components to a HIP-based Mobile world  . . . . . . . . .   3
     3.1.  Service to HIT mapping by device/owner name . . . . . . .   3
     3.2.  HIT to IP mapping service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     3.3.  Shortest Path Routing support . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Providing services to meet mobility needs . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.1.  Scaleable HITs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.2.  Additional services associated with the HDA RVS . . . . .   4
     4.3.  Preparing to use an HHIT  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.4.  Protecting privacy of an HHIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.5.  Contacting a device based on its HHIT . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.6.  Intra-HDA peering agreements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.7.  Maintaining the HIP session through all mobility events .   6
   5.  HIP proxies to Legacy (non-HIP) hosts . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Appendix A.  Calculating Collision Probabilities  . . . . . . . .   7
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7

1.  Introduction

   IP mobility in the next generation cellular networks will demand
   shortest path routing, transportation of data secure from a laundry
   list of attacks, minimal cost infrastructure, and a viable business
   model for the providers of the 5GPP infrastructure.

   Infrastructure costs for the 5GPP network come in many forms.  Costs
   can arise from the cost to support network services, or costs to
   encapsulate data, or network over-provisioning costs to reduce
   network delays.  At the heart of all the 3GPP mobility costs is the
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