Real Time Internet Peering Protocol
draft-rosenbergjennings-dispatch-ripp-03

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Last updated 2019-07-08
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Network Working Group                                       J. Rosenberg
Internet-Draft                                                     Five9
Intended status: Standards Track                             C. Jennings
Expires: January 9, 2020                                   Cisco Systems
                                                            A. Minessale
                                                   Signalwire/Freeswitch
                                                            J. Livingood
                                                                 Comcast
                                                               J. Uberti
                                                                  Google
                                                            July 8, 2019

                  Real Time Internet Peering Protocol
                draft-rosenbergjennings-dispatch-ripp-03

Abstract

   This document specifies the Realtime Internet Peering Protocol
   (RIPP).  RIPP is used to provide telephony peering between a trunking
   provider (such as a telco), and a trunking consumer (such as an
   enterprise, cloud PBX provider, cloud contact center provider, and so
   on).  RIPP is an alternative to SIP, SDP and RTP for this use case,
   and is designed as a web application using HTTP/3.  Using HTTP/3
   allows trunking consumers to more easily build their applications on
   top of cloud platforms, such as AWS, Azure and Google Cloud, all of
   which are heavily focused on HTTP based services.  RIPP also
   addresses many of the challenges of traditional SIP-based trunking.
   Most notably, it mandates secure caller ID via STIR, and provides
   automated trunk provisioning as a mandatory protocol component.  RIPP
   supports both direct and "BYO" trunk configurations.  Since it runs
   over HTTP/3, it works through NATs and firewalls with the same ease
   as HTTP does, and easily supports load balancing with elastic cluster
   expansion and contraction, including auto-scaling - all because it is
   nothing more than an HTTP application.  RIPP also provides built in
   mechanisms for migrations of calls between RIPP client and server
   instances, enabling failover with call preservation.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

Rosenberg, et al.        Expires January 9, 2020                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                    RIPP                         July 2019

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 9, 2020.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Background  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.3.  Solution  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     1.4.  Why Now?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.  Solution Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   3.  Design Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.1.  HBH, not E2E  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.2.  Client-Server, not Agent-to-Agent . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     3.3.  Signaling and Media Together  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     3.4.  URIs not IPs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     3.5.  OAuth not MTLS or private IP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     3.6.  TLS not SRTP or SIPS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     3.7.  Authenticated CallerID  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     3.8.  Calls Separate from Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.9.  Path Validation, not ICE  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
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