A Generic Ciphertext Format
draft-sheffer-ietf-ciphertext-format-00

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Authors Yaron Sheffer  , Gleb Keselman  , Yoav Nir 
Last updated 2020-11-18
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Network Working Group                                         Y. Sheffer
Internet-Draft                                               G. Keselman
Intended status: Standards Track                                  Intuit
Expires: May 22, 2021                                             Y. Nir
                                                       Dell Technologies
                                                       November 18, 2020

                      A Generic Ciphertext Format
                draft-sheffer-ietf-ciphertext-format-00

Abstract

   This document defines a format for encrypted data, that allows to
   detect such data in large data stores, and associate it back to the
   system where it was created and the key with which it was encrypted.
   This allows organizations to extend the concept of data governance to
   encrypted data, and to manage such data even when encrypted by
   multiple systems and cloud providers.

   We intend to standardize this format through the IETF, and the
   document is organized as an Internet Draft.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 22, 2021.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2020 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of

Sheffer, et al.           Expires May 22, 2021                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft              Ciphertext Format              November 2020

   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction and Design Principles  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Motivation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Design Goals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Previous Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  The Ciphertext Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.1.  Format Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
       3.1.1.  Fixed Header  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
       3.1.2.  Header Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
       3.1.3.  TLV Structures  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
       3.1.4.  Deriving a Specific Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.2.  Receiving Ciphertext  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.3.  Fixed Header Rationale  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.1.  Integrity Protection  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     6.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     6.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     6.3.  URIs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   Appendix A.  Document History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     A.1.  draft-sheffer-ietf-ciphertext-format-00 . . . . . . . . .   9
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9

1.  Introduction and Design Principles

   Organizations that manage sensitive data often employ application-
   level encryption to protect data at rest.  When this solution is
   used, it is common that very large numbers of encrypted data items
   are stored, potentially for a long time.  Security best practices,
   complicated organizational structures, as well as the existence of
   modern key management systems, lead to the proliferation of large
   numbers of encryption keys.  After a while it becomes difficult to
   identify the encryption key that was used for a particular piece of
   data, with the situation becoming even more complicated when multiple
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