Guidelines for Use of the Special Use Names Registry
draft-stw-6761ext-00

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Last updated 2018-10-22
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Network Working Group                                           S. Woolf
Internet-Draft                                          October 22, 2018
Intended status: Informational
Expires: April 25, 2019

          Guidelines for Use of the Special Use Names Registry
                          draft-stw-6761ext-00

Abstract

   RFC 6761 requires that proponents document how a specific name is to
   be treated within the DNS protocol, public database, and
   administrative infrastructure, but doesn't provide any guidance to
   help the community figure out whether a particular registration is
   otherwise beneficial.  This limited guidance in RFC 6761 provides
   flexibility in a difficult area-- the use of domain names in the
   modern Internet outside of conventional DNS protocol or the public
   DNS database-- which has been useful from time to time but has also
   caused significant confusion (see RFC 8244).

   This document attempts to define guidelines for the IESG and the IETF
   community on the interpretation of RFC 6761 and the use of the
   special use names registry.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 25, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

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Internet-Draft      Name Registraqtion Considerations       October 2018

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Use Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Specific guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  More on Domain Name Hierarchy and the Special Case of Top-
       Level Domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9

1.  Introduction

   From time to time, networking protocols need to be able to name
   things used within the protocol, and resolve the names created or
   referenced.  Such identifiers may also need to be persistent in time,
   across administrative and operational realms, or through other
   transformations.  Necessary operations tend to include creating,
   modifying, and deleting names, and accessing values and relationships
   that correspond to them.

   It's common for protocol designers to try to use domain names as the
   starting point for their systems of names, and the DNS as the
   starting point for name resolution.  This is completely
   understandable-- domain names, and DNS resolution, are well-
   established in the expectations of network users and developers.
   They're also well-supported by fielded software and a large public
   database of names and values, with many use cases already represented
   by example.

   However, there are some risks when the protocol designer attempts to
   re-use domain names and DNS, even (or especially) with modifications,
   to support a specific use case or protocol design or deployment
   constraint.  These have been touched upon in several RFCs, and in the
   evolution of DNS protocol itself and the use of domain names as new
   needs and constraints appear.  See in particular RFC 6055 ("IAB
   Thoughts on Encodings for Internationalized Domain Names"), RFC 6950
   ("Architectural Considerations on Application Features in the DNS"),

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   and RFC 6943 ("Issues in Identifier Comparison for Security
   Purposes").
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