An Architecture for Secure Content Delegation using HTTP
draft-thomson-http-scd-02

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Network Working Group                                         M. Thomson
Internet-Draft                                                   Mozilla
Intended status: Standards Track                             G. Eriksson
Expires: May 3, 2017                                         C. Holmberg
                                                                Ericsson
                                                        October 30, 2016

        An Architecture for Secure Content Delegation using HTTP
                       draft-thomson-http-scd-02

Abstract

   An architecture is described for content distribution using a
   secondary server that might be operated with reduced privileges.
   This architecture allows a primary server to delegate the
   responsibility for delivery of the payload of an HTTP response to a
   secondary server.  The secondary server is unable to modify this
   content.  The content is encrypted, which in some cases will prevent
   the secondary server from learning about the content.

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 3, 2017.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect

Thomson, et al.            Expires May 3, 2017                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft          Secure Content Delegation           October 2016

   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Content Distribution Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Secure Content Delegation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  Notational Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Out-of-Band Content Encoding  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.1.  Performance Trade-Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.2.  Confidentiality of Resource Identity  . . . . . . . . . .   5
   3.  Content Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  Content Confidentiality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Resource Map  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   6.  Error Handling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     7.1.  Confidentiality Protection Limitations  . . . . . . . . .   8
     7.2.  Cross-Origin Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     7.3.  Traffic Analysis  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Appendix A.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

1.  Content Distribution Security

   The distribution of content on the web at scale is necessarily highly
   distributed.  Large amounts of content needs large numbers of
   servers.  And distributing those servers closer to clients has a
   significant, positive impact on performance.

   A major drawback of existing solutions for content distribution is
   that a primary server is required to cede control of resources to the
   secondary server.  The secondary server is able to see and modify
   content that they distribute.

   There are few technical mechanisms in place to limit the capabilities
   of servers that provide content for a given origin.  Mechanisms like
   content security policy [CSP] and sub-resource integrity [SRI] can be
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