Skip to main content

The Harmful Consequences of Postel's Maxim
draft-thomson-postel-was-wrong-00

The information below is for an old version of the document.
Document Type
This is an older version of an Internet-Draft whose latest revision state is "Replaced".
Expired & archived
Author Martin Thomson
Last updated 2015-09-10 (Latest revision 2015-03-09)
Replaced by draft-iab-protocol-maintenance, draft-iab-protocol-maintenance, RFC 9413
RFC stream (None)
Formats
Stream Stream state (No stream defined)
Consensus boilerplate Unknown
RFC Editor Note (None)
IESG IESG state Expired
Telechat date (None)
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)

This Internet-Draft is no longer active. A copy of the expired Internet-Draft is available in these formats:

Abstract

Jon Postel's famous statement in RFC 1122 of "Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send" - is a principle that has long guided the design of Internet protocols and implementations of those protocols. The posture this statement advocates might promote interoperability in the short term, but that short term advantage is outweighed by negative consequences that affect the long term maintenance of a protocol and its ecosystem.

Authors

Martin Thomson

(Note: The e-mail addresses provided for the authors of this Internet-Draft may no longer be valid.)