The IPv6 Flow Label within a RPL domain
draft-thubert-6man-flow-label-for-rpl-01

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6MAN                                                     P. Thubert, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                     Cisco
Intended status: Standards Track                            May 13, 2014
Expires: November 14, 2014

                The IPv6 Flow Label within a RPL domain
                draft-thubert-6man-flow-label-for-rpl-01

Abstract

   This document present how the Flow Label can be used inside a RPL
   domain as a replacement to the RPL option and provides rules for the
   root to set and reset the Flow Label when forwarding between the
   inside of RPL domain and the larger Internet, in both direction.
   This new operation saves 44 bits in each frame, and an eventual IP-
   in-IP encapsulation within the RPL domain that is required for all
   packets that reach outside of the RPL domain.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
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   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on November 14, 2014.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of

Thubert                 Expires November 14, 2014               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   The IPv6 Flow Label within a RPL domain        May 2014

   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  On Wasted Energy  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  LLN flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     1.3.  On Compatibility With Existing Standards  . . . . . . . .   6
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   3.  Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Flow Label Format Within the RPL Domain . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  Root Operation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.1.  Incoming Packets  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.2.  Outgoing Packets  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   6.  RPL node Operation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   10. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     10.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     10.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

1.  Introduction

   The emergence of radio technology enabled a large variety of new
   types of devices to be interconnected, at a very low marginal cost
   compared to wire, at any range from Near Field to interplanetary
   distances, and in circumstances where wiring would be less than
   practical, for instance rotating devices.

   In particular, IEEE802.14.5 [IEEE802154] that is chartered to specify
   PHY and MAC layers for radio Lowpower Lossy Networks (LLNs), defined
   the TimeSlotted Channel Hopping [I-D.ietf-6tisch-tsch] (TSCH) mode of
   operation as part of the IEEE802.15.4e MAC specification in order to
   address Time Sensitive applications.

   The 6TISCH architecture [I-D.ietf-6tisch-architecture] specifies the
   operation IPv6 over TSCH wireless networks attached and synchronized
   by backbone routers.  In that model, route Computation may be
   achieved in a centralized fashion by a Path Computation Element
   (PCE), in a distributed fashion using the Routing Protocol for Low
   Power and Lossy Networks [RFC6550] (RPL), or in a mixed mode.  The
   Backbone Routers may typically serve as roots for the RPL domain.

   6TiSCH was created to simplify the adoption of IETF technology by
   other Standard Defining Organizations (SDOs), in particular in the
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