QUIC: A UDP-Based Secure and Reliable Transport for HTTP/2
draft-tsvwg-quic-protocol-01

The information below is for an old version of the document
Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual in tsv area)
Last updated 2015-10-14 (latest revision 2015-07-13)
Replaced by draft-hamilton-early-deployment-quic
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Network Working Group                                        R. Hamilton
Internet-Draft                                                J. Iyengar
Intended status: Informational                                  I. Swett
Expires: January 9, 2016                                         A. Wilk
                                                                  Google
                                                            July 8, 2015

       QUIC: A UDP-Based Secure and Reliable Transport for HTTP/2
                      draft-tsvwg-quic-protocol-01

Abstract

   QUIC (Quick UDP Internet Connection) is a new multiplexed and secure
   transport atop UDP, designed from the ground up and optimized for
   HTTP/2 semantics.  While built with HTTP/2 as the primary application
   protocol, QUIC builds on decades of transport and security
   experience, and implements mechanisms that make it attractive as a
   modern general-purpose transport.  QUIC provides multiplexing and
   flow control equivalent to HTTP/2, security equivalent to TLS, and
   connection semantics, reliability, and congestion control equivalent
   to TCP.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 9, 2016.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of

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   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

1.  Contributors

   This protocol is the outcome of work by many engineers, not just the
   authors of this document.  The design and rationale behind QUIC draw
   significantly from work by Jim Roskind.  In alphabetical order, the
   contributors to the project are: Wan-Teh Chang, Britt Cyr, Ryan
   Hamilton, Jana Iyengar, Fedor Kouranov, Jo Kulik, Adam Langley, Jim
   Roskind, Robbie Shade, Satyam Shekhar, Ian Swett, Raman Tenneti,
   Antonio Vicente, Patrik Westin, Alyssa Wilk, Dale Worley, Daniel
   Ziegler.

2.  Acknowledgments

   Special thanks are due to the following for helping shape QUIC and
   its deployment: Chris Bentzel, Misha Efimov, Roberto Peon, Alistair
   Riddoch, Siddharth Vijayakrishnan, and Assar Westerlund.  QUIC has
   also benefited immensely from discussions with folks in private
   conversations and public ones on the proto-quic@chromium.org mailing
   list.

3.  Introduction

   QUIC (Quick UDP Internet Connection) is a new multiplexed and secure
   transport atop UDP, designed from the ground up and optimized for
   HTTP/2 semantics.  While built with HTTP/2 as the primary application
   protocol, QUIC builds on decades of transport and security
   experience, and implements mechanisms that make it attractive as a
   modern general-purpose transport.  QUIC provides multiplexing and
   flow control equivalent to HTTP/2, security equivalent to TLS, and
   connection semantics, reliability, and congestion control equivalent
   to TCP.

   QUIC operates entirely in userspace, and is currently shipped to
   users as a part of the Chromium browser, enabling rapid deployment
   and experimentation.  As a userspace transport atop UDP, QUIC allows
   innovations which have proven difficult to deploy with existing
   protocols as they are hampered by legacy clients and middleboxes, or
   by prolonged Operating System development and deployment cycles.

   An important goal for QUIC is to inform better transport design
   through rapid experimentation.  As a result, we hope to inform and

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   where possible migrate distilled changes into TCP and TLS, which tend
   to have much longer iteration cycles.
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