Happy Eyeballs Considerations for HTTP State Management Mechanisms
draft-vyncke-v6ops-happy-eyeballs-cookie-00

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IPv6 Operations                                                E. Vyncke
Internet-Draft                                                     Cisco
Intended status: Informational                          October 27, 2014
Expires: April 30, 2015

   Happy Eyeballs Considerations for HTTP State Management Mechanisms
              draft-vyncke-v6ops-happy-eyeballs-cookie-00

Abstract

   HTTP servers usually save session states in their persistent storage
   indexed by session cookies generated by the HTTP servers.  It is up
   to the HTTP user-agent to send this session cookie on each HTTP
   request.  Some HTTP servers check whether the cookie is associated
   with the HTTP user-agent by the means of the user-agent IP address...

   If the Happy Eyeball mechanism is used to select between IPv6 and
   IPv4, it may happen that while using the same HTTP server, some HTTP
   requests are done over IPv6 and the others over IPv4, which leads to
   two different sets of session states in the HTTP server.  This has
   the consequence of inconsistencies at the HTTP server.

   The only purpose of this document is to document this issue.

   A similar problem arises with the use of non RFC 6888 compliant Large
   Scale NAT (LSN) devices used to access an IPv4-only HTTP server.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 30, 2015.

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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  HTTP Session Management with HTTP Cookie  . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Other Use of Session Cookies  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Happy Eyeballs Issue  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Large Scale NAT Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  Potential Mitgation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   8.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   9.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5

1.  HTTP Session Management with HTTP Cookie

   HTTP requests are basically stateless, therefore if a HTTP server
   requires to have some states associated to a HTTP user-agent (such as
   user name, login state, history, shopping basket, ...), there is a
   need to conserve those states.  This is usually done by using a HTTP
   cookie (see also [RFC6265]) identifying the session; also called
   "session state cookie".

   This session state cookie is generated by the HTTP server at the very
   first HTTP request from a HTTP user-agent.  The cookie is usually
   opaque (often a random number) and has no semantic except as being an
   index within the persistent storage of the HTTP server.  This index
   is used to access the complete state of the user-agent.  This
   mechanism is secure if the cookie is transferred with confidentiality
   between the server and the user-agent.  If the cookie transfer and
   storage are not secured, then any hostile user-agent can reuse this
   cookie to access the full original session states (including shopping
   basket, payment details, ...).

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   Some HTTP applications link the user-agent IP address (whether IPv6
   or IPv4) to the session state, probably for additional security
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