TLS Proxy Best Practice
draft-wang-tls-proxy-best-practice-00

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Last updated 2019-11-04
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OPSEC Working Group                                              E. Wang
Internet-Draft                                                A. Ossipov
Intended status: Informational                       Cisco Systems, Inc.
Expires: May 7, 2020                                           R. DuToit
                                                                Symantec
                                                       November 04, 2019

                        TLS Proxy Best Practice
                 draft-wang-tls-proxy-best-practice-00

Abstract

   TLS proxies are widely deployed by organizations to enable security
   features and apply enterprise policies.  This document defines a TLS
   proxy and discusses a wide range of security requirements to guide
   TLS proxy implementations.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 7, 2020.

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   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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Wang, et al.               Expires May 7, 2020                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                   tlsp-bp                   November 2019

   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Conventions and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Security and Privacy Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.1.  Securely provision within the administrative domain . . .   4
     4.2.  Maintain security posture and limit modifications . . . .   5
     4.3.  Be secure by default  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.4.  Use independent key material  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.5.  Protect against known vulnerabilities . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.6.  Detect and propagate protocol version downgrade markers .   7
     4.7.  Implement special measures to handle session resumption .   7
     4.8.  Adapt to protocol changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.9.  Respect regulations and privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.10. Respect sensitivity of decrypted payload  . . . . . . . .   8
     4.11. Enforce certificate validation standards  . . . . . . . .   8
     4.12. Provide a secure operating environment  . . . . . . . . .   9
   5.  Usability and Functional Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.1.  Provide the ability to enforce policy without intercept .   9
     5.2.  Selectively decrypt based on policy . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     5.3.  Limit performance impact  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   6.  Security & Privacy Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14

1.  Introduction

   A TLS proxy refers to a set of network functions and products that
   intercept TLS sessions per an organizational security policy.  A TLS
   proxy is deployed between endpoints such as TLS clients and servers.
   Based on an organizational policy, it may proxy a TLS handshake by
   terminating it on the client side and starting a new handshake with
   the server.  As a result, the TLS proxy is able to decrypt the
   traffic from each side of the TLS session for various purposes, and
   then optionally re-encrypt the traffic before forwarding it to the
   other side of the session.  A TLS proxy may leverage the session
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