Identifying and Handling Non Queue Building Flows in a Bottleneck Link
draft-white-tsvwg-nqb-00

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Transport Area Working Group                                    G. White
Internet-Draft                                                 CableLabs
Intended status: Informational                          October 22, 2018
Expires: April 25, 2019

 Identifying and Handling Non Queue Building Flows in a Bottleneck Link
                        draft-white-tsvwg-nqb-00

Abstract

   This draft discusses the potential to improve quality of experience
   for broadband internet applications by distinguishing between flows
   that cause queuing latency and flows that don't.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 25, 2019.

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   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Non-Queue Building Flows  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Identifying NQB traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     3.1.  Endpoint marking  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.2.  Queuing behavior analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  Non Queue Building PHB  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  End-to-end Support  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   6.  Relationship to L4S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  Comparison to Existing Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   9.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   10. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   11. Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   Residential broadband internet services are commonly configured with
   a single bottleneck link (the access network link) upon which the
   service definition is applied.  The service definition, typically an
   upstream/downstream data rate tuple, is implemented as a configured
   pair of rate shapers that are applied to the user's traffic.  In such
   networks, the quality of service that each application receives, and
   as a result, the quality of experience that it generates for the user
   is influenced by the characteristics of the access network link.

   The vast majority of packets that are carried by residential
   broadband access networks are managed by an end-to-end congestion
   control algorithm, such as Reno, Cubic or BBR.  These congestion
   control algorithms attempt to seek the available capacity of the end-
   to-end path (which in the case of residential broadband networks, can
   frequently be the access network link), and in doing so generally
   overshoot the available capacity, causing a queue to build-up at the
   bottleneck link.  This queue build up results in queuing delay that
   the application experiences as variable latency.

   In contrast to congestion-controlled applications, there are a
   variety of relatively low data rate applications that do not
   materially contribute to queueing delay, but are nonetheless
   subjected to it by sharing the same bottleneck link in the access
   network.  Many of these applications may be sensitive to latency or
   latency variation, and thus produce a poor quality of experience in
   such conditions.

   Active Queue Management (AQM) mechanisms (such as PIE [RFC8033],
   DOCSIS-PIE [RFC8034], or CoDel [RFC8289]) can improve the quality of

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