Overlay Path Option for IP and TCP
draft-williams-overlaypath-ip-tcp-rfc-02

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Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Author Brandon Williams 
Last updated 2012-09-12
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Network Working Group                                        B. Williams
Internet-Draft                                              Akamai, Inc.
Intended status: Standards Track                         September  2012
Expires: March 5, 2013

                   Overlay Path Option for IP and TCP
                draft-williams-overlaypath-ip-tcp-rfc-02

Abstract

   Data transport through overlay networks often uses either connection
   termination or network address translation (NAT) in such a way that
   the public IP addresses of the true endpoint machines involved in the
   data transport are invisible to each other.  This document describes
   IPv4, IPv6, and TCP options for communicating this information from
   the overlay network to the endpoint machines.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on March 5, 2013.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as

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Internet-Draft     Overlay Path Option for IP and TCP    September  2012

   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Detailed Use Case  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   3.  Option Format  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     3.1.  Version 1  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     3.2.  Version 2  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
   4.  Network Traversal  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   5.  Option Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   6.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   7.  Forward Compatibility Support  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   8.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
   9.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
   Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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1.  Introduction

   An overlay network is a network of machines distributed throughout
   multiple autonomous systems within the public Internet that can be
   used to improve the performance of data transport.  IP packets from
   the sender are delivered first to one of the machines that make up
   the overlay network.  That machine will relay the IP packets via one
   or more other machines in the overlay network, applying various
   performance enhancement methods and eventually delivering the packets
   to the real intended receiver.  Such overlay networks are used to
   improve the performance of content delivery [IEEE1344002].  Overlay
   networks are also used for peer-to-peer data transport [RFC5694], and
   they have been suggested for use in improved scalability for the
   internet routing infrastructure [RFC6179].

   Data transport through such an overlay network will often use network
   address translation for the source (SNAT) or destination (DNAT)
   addresses [RFC2663] in such a way that the public IP addresses of the
   true endpoint machines involved in the data transport are invisible
   to each other.  For example, the actual sender and receiver may use
   two completely different pairs of source and destination addresses to
   identify the connection on the sending and receiving networks.

   ---------------------------------------------------------------------

             ip hdr contains:               ip hdr contains:
   SENDER -> src = sender   --> OVERLAY --> src = overlay2  --> RECEIVER
             dst = overlay1                 dst = receiver
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