Multicast BABEL Extension
draft-zhang-pim-babel-ext-01

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PIM WG                                                      Zheng. Zhang
Internet-Draft                                           ZTE Corporation
Intended status: Standards Track                            Stig. Venaas
Expires: September 13, 2017                              Pierre. Pfister
                                                     Cisco Systems, Inc.
                                                          March 12, 2017

                       Multicast BABEL Extension
                      draft-zhang-pim-babel-ext-01

Abstract

   This document describes a method that uses Babel protocol extension
   to deliver multicast information.  Babel protocol extension is used
   to signal receiver multicast interest.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 13, 2017.

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Zhang, et al.          Expires September 13, 2017               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft          Multicast BABEL Extension             March 2017

Table of Contents

   1.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   3.  Babel extensions for multicast information  . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Protocol treatment  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.1.  LHR treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.2.  FHR treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
       4.2.1.  Confliction treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.3.  Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  Security Consideration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Terminology

   FHR: First Hop Router, directly connected to the source.

   LHR: Last Hop Router, directly connected to the receiver.

2.  Introduction

   As described in [I-D.ietf-babel-applicability], Babel is a loop-
   avoiding distance-vector routing protocol that aims to be robust in a
   variety of environments.  And it has seen a number of successful
   deployments in hybrid network; large scale overlay networks and small
   unchanged networks.

   BIER introduces a novel architecture for multicast packet forwarding.
   It does not require a signaling protocol to explicitly build
   multicast distribution trees, nor does it require intermediate nodes
   to maintain any per-flow state.

   When BIER is deployed in a network, a protocol such as MLD is used to
   deliver the multicast overlay information.  The multicast information
   includes multicast source address and group address, and other
   information that may be used to indicate the multicast flow.  It is
   the commonly used method in large network that is well-managed.  But
   when BIER is used in middle or small network that is not well-
   managed, such as some data centers and home network, the overlay
   protocol will cause the complication of network management.

   Suppose that there is a middle size network that uses Babel protocol
   to connect every router, and there are dozens of routers in it.  The
   users in the network have the IPTV and other live broadcast
   requirement.  It is obviously that it will be more efficient that use
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