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Versions: 00 01 02 03 04                                                
MULTIMOB Group                                                 H. Asaeda
Internet-Draft                                           Keio University
Expires: September 9, 2009                                  T C. Schmidt
                                                             HAW Hamburg
                                                           March 8, 2009


          IGMP and MLD Extensions for Mobile Hosts and Routers
         draft-asaeda-multimob-igmp-mld-mobility-extensions-02

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   Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.




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   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents in effect on the date of
   publication of this document (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info).
   Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
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Abstract

   This document describes IGMP and MLD protocol extensions for mobile
   hosts and routers.  IGMP and MLD are necessary protocols for hosts to
   request join or leave multicast sessions.  While the regular IGMP and
   MLD protocols support communication between mobile hosts and routers
   over wireless networks, this document discusses the conditions how
   mobile hosts and routers use IGMP and MLD in their communication more
   effectively.  Aside from a modified protocol semantic, optional
   "Notification function" and "Listener Hold function" for the IGMP and
   MLD protocols are introduced.








































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Conventions used in this document

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL
   NOT","SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED","MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in
   this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [1].


Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   2.  Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     2.1.  Tracking of Membership Status  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     2.2.  IGMP/MLD Query Coordination  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
       2.2.1.  Unicasting IGMP/MLD General Query  . . . . . . . . . .  8
       2.2.2.  Multicasting IGMP/MLD Group-Specific Query . . . . . .  9
     2.3.  IGMP/MLD Querier Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   3.  Protocol Extensions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     3.1.  IGMP/MLD Notification  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
       3.1.1.  Interoperability of IGMP/MLD Notification  . . . . . . 12
     3.2.  IGMP/MLD Hold and Release  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
       3.2.1.  Action of Mobile Host and Router for IGMP/MLD Hold . . 13
       3.2.2.  Action of Mobile Host and Router for IGMP/MLD
               Release  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       3.2.3.  IGMP/MLD Hold Message Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       3.2.4.  IGMP/MLD Hold Timer  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
       3.2.5.  Interoperability of IGMP/MLD Hold and Release  . . . . 17
     3.3.  Lightweight-IGMP/MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   4.  Interoperability with Older Protocols  . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
   5.  Timers, Counters, and Their Default Values . . . . . . . . . . 20
   6.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
   7.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
   8.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
     8.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
     8.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
















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1.  Introduction

   The Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) [2] for IPv4 and the
   Multicast Listener Discovery Protocol (MLD) [3] for IPv6 are the
   standard protocols for hosts to initiate joining or leaving multicast
   sessions.  These protocols must be also supported by multicast
   routers or IGMP/MLD proxy routers [7] that serve multicast member
   hosts on their downstream interfaces.  Conceptually, IGMP and MLD
   work on wireless networks.  However, wireless access technologies
   operate on a shared medium or a point-to-point link with limited
   frequency and bandwidth.  In many wireless regimes, it is desirable
   to minimize multicast-related signaling to preserve the limited
   resources of battery powered mobile devices and the constrained
   transmission capacities of the networks (e.g., [12]).  Additionally,
   a mobile host may cause initiation and termination of a multicast
   service in the new or the previous network.  Slow multicast service
   activation following a join may degrade reception quality.  Slow
   service termination triggered by IGMP/MLD querying or by a rapid
   departure of the mobile host without leaving the group in the
   previous network may waste network resources.

   To create feasible condition for mobile hosts and routers
   communicating IGMP/MLD, it is required to "ease processing cost or
   battery power consumption by eliminating transmission of a large
   number of IGMP/MLD messages via flooding" and "realize fast state
   convergence by successive monitoring whether downstream members exist
   or not".  One possible approach to support these requirements is
   explicit tracking.  Upstream router traces all downstream members,
   thereby limiting the number of solicited membership reports (by
   periodical multicast IGMP/MLD Query).  The number of transmitted
   IGMP/MLD messages is effectively reduced, and the upstream router can
   immediately update the membership information and proceed the fast
   leave.

   The explicit tracking function is supported by IGMPv3 [2] and MLDv2
   [3].  In the previous version protocols, IGMPv1 [4], IGMPv2 [5], and
   MLDv1 [6], a host would cancel sending a pending membership reports
   requested by IGMP/MLD Query if a similar report was observed from
   another member on the network.  This specification effectively
   reduced a possibility of network congestion or message flooding, but
   precluded the function for an upstream router to track membership
   status.  On the other hand, in IGMPv3 and MLDv2, the membership
   report suppression mechanism has been removed, and therefore
   downstream member hosts speaking IGMPv3 or MLDv2 must send their
   membership reports to an upstream router and the router can keep
   track of their membership status.

   IGMPv3/MLDv2 Query messages are still necessary to maintain



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   downstream membership status.  One of the reasons is that IGMP/MLD
   message is non-reliable and may be lost in the transmission, and
   therefore the router would need to confirm the membership by sending
   query messages.  The other reason is that, for keeping track of
   membership status, the router needs additional processing cost and a
   possibly large size of the memory to record all member information.
   IGMPv3/MLDv2 capable routers usually configure to send periodical
   IGMP/MLD Query messages to seek membership information to the
   downstream hosts, and disable the function that keeps track of
   membership status.  The requirement to keep the compatibility mode
   with older version IGMP/MLD is also the reason, because the router
   needs to support the downstream hosts that are not upgraded to the
   latest versions of IGMP/MLD and run the report suppression mechanism.

   IGMPv3 and MLDv2 provide the ability for hosts to report source-
   specific subscriptions.  With IGMPv3/MLDv2, a mobile host can specify
   a channel of interest, using multicast group and source addresses
   with INCLUDE filter mode in its join request.  Upon reception, the
   upstream router establishes the shortest path tree toward the source
   without coordinating a shared tree.  This function is called the
   source filtering function and required to support Source-Specific
   Multicast (SSM) [8].

   IGMPv3 and MLDv2 support another operation with EXCLUDE filter mode.
   When a mobile host specifies multicast and source addresses with
   EXCLUDE filter mode in the join request, an upstream router forwards
   the multicast packets sent from all sources *except* the specified
   sources.  In fact, this operation gives the complexity in the host-
   side procedure.  If any application running on a host requests an
   EXCLUDE filter mode operation, the host sets the interface state to
   EXCLUDE mode for the requested multicast address, and the source
   address list of the interface record is the intersection of the
   source address lists requested by all applications in EXCLUDE mode,
   minus the source addresses that appear in any application in INCLUDE
   mode.  The state transition that maintains the interface record is
   complex, and the implementation cost will be relatively high for
   mobile hosts.

   Furthermore, specifying non-interesting source addresses with EXCLUDE
   filter mode reduces the advantage of scalable routing tree
   coordination produced by SSM.  An upstream router needs to maintain a
   shared tree (e.g., RPT in PIM-SM) whenever the router receives join
   request with EXCLUDE filter mode from the downstream hosts.  This
   increases the tree maintenance cost to the multicast routers on the
   routing paths.  While the mobile multicast communication does not
   prohibit a traditional (*,G) join request (which is a join request
   with EXCLUDE filter mode without specifying any source address), all
   other join requests with EXCLUDE filter mode should be eliminated



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   from the mobile multicast communication.

   This document describes the IGMPv3 and MLDv2 protocol extensions for
   mobile hosts and routers, and discusses the conditions how mobile
   hosts and routers use IGMP and MLD in their communication over
   wireless networks effectively.  The selective solutions that provide
   tangible benefits to the mobile hosts and routers are given by
   "keeping track of downstream hosts' membership status", "varying
   IGMP/MLD Query types and values to tune the number of responses", and
   "using a source filtering mechanism in a lightweight manner".  Aside
   from a modified protocol semantic, optional "Notification function"
   and "Listener Hold function" for the IGMPv3 and MLDv2 protocols are
   introduced.  The proposed solutions interoperate with the IGMPv3 and
   MLDv2 protocols.  This condition is advantageous to the deployment.





































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2.  Configurations

2.1.  Tracking of Membership Status

   Mobile hosts use IGMP and MLD to request to join or leave multicast
   sessions.  When the upstream routers receive the IGMP/MLD reports,
   they recognize the membership status on the LAN.  To update the
   membership status, the routers send IGMP/MLD Query messages
   periodically as a soft-state approach does, and the member hosts
   reply IGMP/MLD report messages upon reception.

   IGMP/MLD Query is therefore necessary to obtain the up-to-date
   membership information, but a large number of the reply messages sent
   from all member hosts may cause network congestion or consume network
   bandwidth.  To escape from the trouble, a membership report
   suppression mechanism was proposed in the traditional IGMP and MLD
   [4][5][6].  By the report suppression mechanism, a host would cancel
   sending a pending membership reports requested by IGMP/MLD Query if a
   similar report was observed from another member on the network.
   However, the report suppression mechanism precluded the function for
   an upstream router to track membership status.  In IGMPv3 and MLDv2,
   it is hence decided that the membership report suppression mechanism
   has been removed, and all downstream member hosts must send their
   membership reports to an upstream router.

2.2.  IGMP/MLD Query Coordination

2.2.1.  Unicasting IGMP/MLD General Query

   IGMP and MLD are non-reliable protocols; to cover the possibility of
   a State-Change Report being missed by one or more multicast routers,
   a host retransmits the same State-Change Report [Robustness Variable]
   - 1 more times, at intervals chosen at random from the range (0,
   [Unsolicited Report Interval]) [2][3].  However, this manner does not
   guarantee that the State-Change Report is reached to the routers.
   The routers therefore need to refresh the downstream membership
   information by receiving Current-State Report periodically solicited
   by IGMP/MLD General Query, in order to be robust in front of host or
   link failures and packet loss.  It supports the situation that mobile
   hosts turn off or move from the wireless network to other wireless
   network managed by the different router without any notification
   (e.g., leave request).

   A multicast router periodically transmits IGMP/MLD General Query in
   the [Query Interval] sec.  The default value of [Query Interval] is
   125 sec. specified in the standard IGMPv3 and MLDv2 specifications
   [2][3].  Unfortunately, periodical message flooding using the all-
   hosts multicast address (i.e. 224.0.0.1 or ff02::1) as its IP



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   destination address gives the unwilling situation to the mobile
   hosts.  It consumes the bandwidth of a wireless link and may wake all
   mobile hosts up by IGMP/MLD General Query.  In fact, when mobile
   hosts are operating in dormant mode and not communicating with
   others, they should keep sleeping for saving the battery power.  In
   this case, only the hosts that are receiving multicast contents
   should make the response to the router.

   A multicast router attached on a wireless link may want to configure
   longer query interval as the [Multicast Query Interval] value
   Section 5, in order to reduce the number of IGMP/MLD General Query
   messages via multicast.  Yet, longer query interval will increase
   join latency when an unsolicit Join message with State-Change Record
   requesting joining a multicast session is not reached to the router,
   or it will increase leave latency when an unsolicit Leave message
   with State-Change Record requesting leaving a session is not reached
   to the router.

   IGMPv3 and MLDv2 specifications [2][3] mention that a host MUST
   accept and procss any Query whose IP Destination Address field
   contains any of the addresses (unicast or multicast) assigned to the
   interface on which the Query arrives.  According to the scenario, a
   router can unicast the message to tracked member hosts in the
   [Unicast Query Interval] (described in Section 5), especially when a
   multicast router has a small number of mobile hosts that are
   listening different multicast sessions.  In this case, the router
   multicasts IGMP/MLD General Query with longer [Multicast Query
   Interval] (described in Section 5) to recognize hosts that were not
   tracked.

2.2.2.  Multicasting IGMP/MLD Group-Specific Query

   In the standard protocols [2][3], an IGMP/MLD Group-Specific Query is
   sent to verify there are no hosts that desire reception of the
   specified group or to rebuild the desired reception state for a
   particular group.  The Group-Specific Query is sent when a router
   receives State-Change Records indicating a host is leaving a group,
   and never in response to Current-State Records.

   A Group-Specific Query builds and refreshes group membership state of
   hosts on attached networks.  Since a Group-Specific Query specifies
   the corresponding multicast address (not the all-hosts multicast
   address) as its IP destination address, dormant mode hosts that do
   not join any multicast session are not woken up by these specific
   Queries, and only active group member hosts that have been receiving
   multicast contents with the specified address reply IGMP/MLD reports.

   However, sending many Group-Specific Queries for all corresponding



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   groups may increase the total number of transmitted IGMP/MLD
   messages.  [TODO: Therefore, it is necessary to know the condition in
   which a Group-Specific Query is used for maintaining the group
   membership state of all hosts on a link, instead of a General Query.]

   The [Multicast Group-Query Interval] is the interval between Group-
   Specific Queries sent by the querier, i.e., the router that sends the
   Group-Specific Query.  [TODO: Define [Multicast Group-Query
   Interval].  We currently think this value is same of the default
   [Query Interval] value the regular IGMP and MLD define [2][3].]

2.3.  IGMP/MLD Querier Selection

   [TODO: Is there any condition or assumption in which multiple
   multicast routers exist in a single wireless link?  If there is the
   case, do we need to consider IGMP/MLD querier selection mechanism and
   the corresponding timer values or intervals?  The Querier's Query
   Interval Code (QQIC) field specifies the [Query Interval] used by the
   querier may be tuned.  The actual interval, called the Querier's
   Query Interval (QQI), is derived from QQIC.  Multicast routers that
   are not the current querier adopt the QQI value from the most
   recently received Query as their own [Query Interval] value.]





























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3.  Protocol Extensions

3.1.  IGMP/MLD Notification

   This document proposes an IGMP/MLD Notification operation, in which a
   mobile host *periodically* sends Current-State Record messages
   expressing which multicast sessions the host is joining, even the
   host is not requested to report the membership information by its
   upstream router (i.e., no reception of General Query message).

   The IGMP/MLD Notification operation enables the longer [Multicast
   Query Interval] value for IGMP/MLD General Query than the default
   [Query Interval].  If mobile hosts support the IGMP/MLD Notification
   operation, a multicast router can obtain downstream membership
   information without periodical and spontaneous membership
   solicitation by IGMP/MLD General Query.  The router only needs to
   refresh downstream membership information by solicit IGMP/MLD General
   Query to the hosts that do not support the IGMP/MLD Notification
   operation or leave from network without sending any message to the
   router.

   If timers are tuned by dynamic nature of membership, the IGMP/MLD
   Notification operation reduces the number of IGMP/MLD General Query
   periodically sent by a router and the total number of IGMP/MLD
   messages.  Since a router only needs to refresh downstream membership
   information by solicit General Query to hosts that do not support the
   Notification operation, both [Unicast Query Interval] and [Multicast
   Query Interval] can be set to longer values.  This mechanism may
   conserve battery power of dormant mode hosts, as dormant mode hosts
   do not pay attention to the General Query messages at short
   intervals.

   The IGMP/MLD Notification operation also contributes to fast
   handover, because a host receiving data immediately sends unsolicited
   reports without waiting for IGMP/MLD General Query at the new
   network.

   The [Notification Interval] value (described in Section 5) is the
   interval of Current-State Records periodically sent by a member host
   that joins at least one multicast session.  Since a mobile host
   periodically unicasts Current-State Record in [Notification Interval]
   that is shorter than the regular General Query interval (i.e.  [Query
   Interval] value) and [Multicast Query Interval] and [Unicast Query
   Interval], even if a router tracking membership status misses State-
   Change report that requests a leave operation, the router can operate
   a leave procedure faster than the regular case.  When mobile hosts
   receive IGMP/MLD General Query, they reset their [Notification
   Interval] timer value and restart it.



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   When a multicast router works with the Notification operation, it
   must maintain the following information for each multicast session to
   recognize receiver host's membership status;

   1      Receiver address - indicates an address of a receiver host
          sending the Current-State Report.

   2      Last membership report - indicates the time that the router
          receives the last Current-State Report.

   3      Filter mode - indicates either INCLUDE or EXCLUDE as defined
          in [2][3].

   4      Source addresses and multicast address - indicates the address
          pair that the receiver joins.

3.1.1.  Interoperability of IGMP/MLD Notification

   An IGMP/MLD Notification operation is a simple extension for mobile
   hosts to spontaneously send IGMP/MLD Current-State Report to their
   upstream multicast routers.  Since a multicast router solicits
   downstream membership information by IGMP/MLD General Query, non-
   upgraded mobile hosts can coexist in the network.  However, join and
   leave latency for non-upgraded mobile hosts may become longer due to
   the longer [Query Interval] timer configuration for multicast
   routers.

   An IGMP/MLD Notification operation does not require amy modification
   to multicast routers.

3.2.  IGMP/MLD Hold and Release

   A mobile host sends a join/leave request for particular multicast
   session to its upstream router (i.e., a proxy router or an adjacent
   router), and the router will maintain IGMP/MLD state of the host and
   serve multicast data to the host.  According to a fast handover
   scenario (e.g., using FMIPv6 [10]), a mobile host wants to accelerate
   multicast service termination in the previous network before handoff
   and immediately rejoin the session after the movement.  As the
   router's behavior, when the router remains part of the multicast
   delivery tree, it keeps the session active without leaving from the
   session, while the data transmission is paused until the host
   completes the movement and resumed after the movement.

   This document describes an IGMP/MLD Hold operation that enables to
   keep the membership state for fast packet forwarding, and an IGMP/MLD
   Release operation that ressumes forwarding the multicast session
   after the host movement.  Originally, an idea of MLD Hold was



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   proposed in [13].

   Note that discussing the procedure of context transfer (CT) for each
   mobility protocol (e.g., FMIPv6, PMIPv6 [11]) and the message format
   for CT will be defined in other documents.  And also, discussing how
   a mobile host or a router detects the movement and triggers to send
   an IGMP/MLD Hold message is depend on the mobility protocol, and
   hence out of scope of this document.

3.2.1.  Action of Mobile Host and Router for IGMP/MLD Hold

   An IGMP/MLD Hold operation is used to notify an upstream multicast
   router (e.g., HA in case of bidirectional tunneling, adjacent router
   in case of remote subscription) to stop forwarding data of the
   specified multicast sessions if there is no member joining the same
   sessions, but maintain the multicast membership on the router's
   interface the message was received.

   When a mobile host starts moving from a network to a new network, the
   host or the gateway that detects the movement sends an IGMP/MLD Hold
   message (mentioned in Section 3.2.3) to its upstream router to make a
   fast handover for the specified multicast sessions.

   When the multicast router receives an IGMP/MLD Hold message from a
   mobile host, it records the host's address and specified group and
   source address records and filter-mode, and stops the corresponding
   group or source timer until the IGMP/MLD [Hold Interval] timer
   (described in Section 5) is expired.  The router does not send any
   Group-Specific or Group-and-Source Specific Query upon reception of
   an IGMP/MLD Hold message.

   After the router recognizes the IGMP/MLD Hold message, the router
   decides whether it stops forwarding the data or not.  The decision is
   dependent on whether the router has been keeping track of membership
   status.  If the router has been tracking all the members, it can
   recognize whether the message sender host is the last member joining
   the notified session on the interface or not.  If the router has not
   been tracking, the router waits for receiving the next Current-State
   Report and recognizes whether the host is the last member joining the
   notified session on the interface or not.  And if the message sender
   host is the last member, the router stops forwarding data by
   disabling the outgoing interface for that session, whereas it keeps
   the host's membership state.  If the host is not the last member of
   the session, the router does not stop forwarding the data even with
   reception of this message.






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3.2.2.  Action of Mobile Host and Router for IGMP/MLD Release

   An IGMP/MLD Release operation is used to restart forwarding data of
   the specified multicast sessions that are kept with the membership
   state at a router, or used to cancel the hold request previously
   notified by an IGMP/MLD Hold message.

   When a mobile host moves to a new network, the host or the gateway
   that detects the movement operates IGMP/MLD Release by sending a
   standard IGMP/MLD Current-State Report message as mentioned in
   Section 3.2.3) to its upstream router to release the hold request
   previously sent.

   When a multicast router receives an IGMP/MLD Current-State Report
   message, the router examines the message sender and an IGMP/MLD [Hold
   Interval] timer (see Section 5).  If the router has tracked the
   host's membership status, it compares the holding Multicast Address
   Records and notified Multicast Address Records specified in the IGMP/
   MLD Current-State Report message.  Regarding the corresponding
   Multicast Address Records, the router will delete the host's
   membership state if it has, and restart the given group or source
   timer and forwarding the data again if the IGMP/MLD Hold Timer is not
   expired.

   If either a multicast router has not tracked the corresponding
   membership status given by the host that sent the IGMP/MLD Current-
   State Report message, or if the IGMP/MLD Hold Timer has expired, then
   the router does not take any action.

   If a router that did not recognize an IGMP/MLD Hold message (e.g.,
   due to packet loss or some troubles in its transmission) receives an
   IGMP/MLD Current-State Report message, it will accept the message as
   a regular Current-State Report IGMP/MLD message as specified in
   Section 3.2.5.

3.2.3.  IGMP/MLD Hold Message Format

   The following figure is the Report message format defined in IGMPv3
   [2] and MLDv2 [3].  Type field is either IGMP Version 3 Membership
   Report (0x22) or Version 2 Multicast Listener Report (decimal 143);
   it is not necessary to change IGMP/MLD Report message format to
   support IGMP/MLD Hold messages.









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      0                   1                   2                   3
      0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |      Type     |    Reserved   |           Checksum            |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |           Reserved            |Nr of Mcast Address Records (M)|
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |                                                               |
     .                                                               .
     .               Multicast Address Record [1]                    .
     .                                                               .
     |                                                               |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     .                               .                               .
     .                               .                               .
     .                               .                               .
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |                                                               |
     .                                                               .
     .               Multicast Address Record [M]                    .
     .                                                               .
     |                                                               |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   The Multicast Address Record shown in the following figure defines
   new Record Types that express an IGMP/MLD Hold message.  For an IGMP/
   MLD Release operation, the standard IGMP/MLD Current-State Report
   message is used.























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     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |  Record Type  |  Aux Data Len |     Number of Sources (N)     |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |                                                               |
     .                                                               .
     .                       Multicast Address                       .
     .                                                               .
     |                                                               |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |                                                               |
     .                                                               .
     .                       Source Address [1]                      .
     .                                                               .
     |                                                               |
     +-                                                             -+
     .                               .                               .
     .                               .                               .
     .                               .                               .
     +-                                                             -+
     |                                                               |
     .                                                               .
     .                       Source Address [N]                      .
     .                                                               .
     |                                                               |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |                                                               |
     .                                                               .
     .                         Auxiliary Data                        .
     .                                                               .
     |                                                               |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+


   Value  Name and Meaning
   -----  ----------------

   7      HOLD_INCLUDE - indicates that the interface has a filter mode
          of INCLUDE for the specified multicast address.  The Source
          Address [i] fields in this Multicast Address Record contain
          the interface's source list for the specified multicast
          address.  A HOLD_INCLUDE Record is never sent with an empty
          source list.

   8      HOLD_EXCLUDE - indicates that the interface has a filter mode
          of EXCLUDE for the specified multicast address.  The Source
          Address [i] fields in this Multicast Address Record contain
          the interface's source list for the specified multicast
          address, if it is non-empty.  When a mobile host works with



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          LW-IGMPv3/LW-MLDv2 (Section 3.3), the Multicast Address Record
          does not contain the Source Address [i] field with
          HOLD_EXCLUDE type value.

3.2.4.  IGMP/MLD Hold Timer

   A router upon receiving an IGMP/MLD Hold message will identify the
   corresponding multicast sessions for which the message was received,
   and once it accepts the request will wait for the [Hold Interval]
   timer period (see Section 5) for the sessions for allowing the router
   on the new link to resume the sessions.  However, if it does not
   receive any IGMP/MLD Current-State Record message for an IGMP/MLD
   Release operation within that given amount of time, it will discard
   the hold membership state given by the IGMP/MLD Hold message and
   proceed as it receives IGMP Leave or MLD Done request.

3.2.5.  Interoperability of IGMP/MLD Hold and Release

   If a multicast router does not support an IGMP/MLD Hold operation, it
   will ignore the IGMP/MLD Hold message.  In this case, an IGMP/MLD
   Current-State Report message sent by a mobile host that previously
   requested an IGMP/MLD Hold operation to stop forwarding data is dealt
   with as a new join request for the specified multicast sessions (when
   the corresponding group or source timer is expired) or simply updates
   the corresponding group and/or source timer (when these timers are
   not expired and the membership status has been still active).

3.3.  Lightweight-IGMP/MLD

   IGMPv3 and MLDv2 enable all member hosts to send membership reports
   to the upstream routers.  Not only this function, IGMPv3 and MLDv2
   support a source filtering function.  An IGMPv3 or MLDv2 capable host
   can tell its upstream router which group it would like to join by
   specifying which sources it does (or does not) intend to receive
   multicast traffic from.  IGMPv3 and MLDv2 add the capability for a
   multicast router to also learn which sources are (and are not) of
   interest to neighboring hosts, for packets sent to any particular
   multicast address.  This source filtering function is required to
   invoke Source-Specific Multicast (SSM) [8].

   IGMPv3 and MLDv2 introduce antithetic filter modes, INCLUDE and
   EXCLUDE filter modes, to expand the source filtering function.  If a
   host wants to receive from specific sources, it sends an IGMPv3 or
   MLDv2 report with the filter mode set to INCLUDE.  If the host does
   not want to receive from some sources, it sends a report with the
   filter mode set to EXCLUDE.  A source list for the given sources
   shall be included in the report message.  INCLUDE and EXCLUDE filter
   modes are also defined in a multicast router to process the IGMPv3 or



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   MLDv2 reports.  When a multicast router receives the report messages
   from its downstream hosts, it forwards the corresponding multicast
   traffic by managing requested group and source addresses.

   However, practical applications do not use EXCLUDE mode to block
   sources very often, because a user or application usually wants to
   specify desired source addresses, not undesired source addresses.  In
   addition, this scheme leads an implementation cost to mobile hosts
   and complex procedures to maintain coexisting situation of the
   interesting source address lists with INCLUDE filter mode or non-
   interesting source address lists with EXCLUDE filter mode.

   Recently, Lightweight-IGMPv3 (LW-IGMPv3) and Lightweight-MLDv2 (LW-
   MLDv2) [9] are proposed in the IETF MBONED working group.  These
   protocols are the simplified versions of IGMPv3 and MLDv2, and
   eliminate an EXCLUDE filter mode operation.  Not only are LW-IGMPv3
   and LW-MLDv2 fully compatible with the full version of these
   protocols (i.e., the standard IGMPv3 and MLDv2), but also the
   protocol operations made by hosts and routers are simplified in the
   lightweight manner, and complicated operations are effectively
   reduced.  LW-IGMPv3 and LW-MLDv2 give the opportunity to grow SSM
   use.

   In the lightweight protocols, EXCLUDE mode on the host part is
   preserved only for EXCLUDE (*,G) join/leave, which denotes a non-
   source-specific group report (known as the traditional (*,G) join/
   leave) and is equivalent to the group membership join/leave triggered
   by IGMPv2/IGMPv1/MLDv1.

   The aim of LW-IGMPv3 and LW-MLDv2 is not only for contributing to the
   simpler implementation or reducing the memory size on a host.
   Another advantage is that it reduces the processing cost on upstream
   routers by eliminating the EXCLUDE filter mode operations.  If both
   INCLUDE and EXCLUDE filter mode operations are supported in the
   networks, the routers need to maintain all source addresses joined
   from their downstream hosts.  Even if a Shortest-Path Tree (SPT) is
   well coordinated, the routers need to refresh (and re-generate) some
   or all of the corresponding routing paths including the Rendezvous-
   Point Tree (RPT) whenever the downstream host requests EXLUDE filter
   mode join.  LW-IGMPv3 and LW-MLDv2 preclude the unwilling situation.
   Since there is no side-effect, this document recommend to adopt LW-
   IGMPv3 and LW-MLDv2 to mobile hosts and routers, or eliminate EXCLUDE
   filter mode operation from mobile hosts if IGMPv3 and MLDv2 are
   adopted to hosts.







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4.  Interoperability with Older Protocols

   This document assumes multicast routers that deal with mobile hosts
   MUST be IGMPv3/MLDv2 capable (regardless whether the protocols are
   the full version or not).  Therefore this document does not consider
   interoprability with older version protocols.













































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5.  Timers, Counters, and Their Default Values

   A multicast router operating in dormant mode keeps track of the
   membership status and checks the membership status by transmitting
   unicast IGMP/MLD General Query or multicast IGMP/MLD Group-Specific
   Query.  Cooperating with these scenarios, the message interval
   between IGMP/MLD General Queries is set to longer than the default
   [Query Interval] value.

   The [Query Interval] is the interval between General Queries sent by
   the regular IGMPv3/MLDv2 querier, and the default value is 125
   seconds [2][3].  By varying the [Query Interval], multicast routers
   can tune the number of IGMP messages on the network; larger values
   cause IGMP Queries to be sent less often.

   [TODO: We will provide the appropriate [Multicast Query Interval]
   value that would fit in the mobile communication environment based on
   some experimental results.  In our current sense, this value should
   be larger than the default [Query Interval] value the regular IGMPv3
   and MLDv2 define.]

   The Query Response Interval is the Max Response Time (or Max Response
   Delay) used to calculate the Max Resp Code inserted into the periodic
   General Queries, and the default value is 10 seconds [2][3].  By
   varying the [Query Response Interval], multicast routers can tune the
   burstiness of IGMP messages on the network; larger values make the
   traffic less bursty, as host responses are spread out over a larger
   interval.

   [TODO: We will provide the appropriate [Query Response Interval]
   value that would fit in the mobile communication environment based on
   some experimental results.  In our current sense, this value should
   be less than the default value the regular IGMP and MLD define,
   because, while the larger Query Interval does not reduce the number
   of transmitted IGMP/MLD messages, it may cause slow leave latency.]

   Mobile hosts may receive a variety of Queries on different interfaces
   and of different kinds (e.g., General Queries, Group-Specific
   Queries, and Group-and-Source-Specific Queries), each of which may
   require its own delayed response.

   [TODO: The timer management for each queries may or should be
   independent.  E.g. the timer value for General Query should be longer
   than the one of other queries.  We will investigate this issue.]

   To cover the possibility of unsolicited reports being missed by
   multicast routers, unsolicited reports are retransmitted [Robustness
   Variable] - 1 more times, at intervals chosen at random from the



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   defined range [2][3].  The QRV (Querier's Robustness Variable) field
   in IGMP/MLD Query contains the [Robustness Variable] value used by
   the querier.  Routers adopt the QRV value from the most recently
   received Query as their own [Robustness Variable] value, whose range
   should be set between "1" to "7".  While the default [Robustness
   Variable] value defined in IGMPv3 [2] and MLDv2 [3] is "2", the
   [Robustness Variable] value announced by the querier must not be "0"
   and should not be "1".

   [TODO: We will propose the robustness values that would be adjusted
   according to the number of receivers.  In our current sense, this
   value should not be bigger than "2" especially when the [Query
   Response Interval] is set to less than its default value.]

   The default [Unicast Query Interval] value is 90 sec.

   The default [Multicast Query Interval] value is 180 sec.

   The default [Notification Interval] value is 60 sec.  The
   [Notification Interval] value must be shorter than [Multicast Query
   Interval] and [Unicast Query Interval].

   The [Hold Interval] is used for the IGMP/MLD Hold Timer Section 3.2.4
   to allow a multicast router to resume the multicast session.  The
   multicast router discards the hold membership state if it does not
   receive any IGMP/MLD Release (or Current-State Record) message for an
   IGMP/MLD Release operation within the [Hold Interval].

   [TODO: We will provide the appropriate [Hold Interval] value that
   would fit in the mobile communication environment based on some
   experimental results.  Does it depend on mobile protocols?]




















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6.  Security Considerations

   TBD.
















































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7.  Acknowledgements

   Dave Thaler, Matthias Waehlisch, and others provided many
   constructive and insightful comments.















































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8.  References

8.1.  Normative References

   [1]   Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to indicate requirement
         levels", RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [2]   Cain, B., Deering, S., Kouvelas, I., Fenner, B., and A.
         Thyagarajan, "Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3",
         RFC 3376, October 2002.

   [3]   Vida, R. and L. Costa, "Multicast Listener Discovery Version 2
         (MLDv2) for IPv6", RFC 3810, June 2004.

   [4]   Deering, S., "Host Extensions for IP Multicasting", RFC 1112,
         August 1989.

   [5]   Fenner, W., "Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 2",
         RFC 2373, July 1997.

   [6]   Deering, S., Fenner, W., and B. Haberman, "Multicast Listener
         Discovery (MLD) for IPv6", RFC 2710, October 1999.

   [7]   Fenner, B., He, H., Haberman, B., and H. Sandick, "Internet
         Group Management Protocol (IGMP) / Multicast Listener Discovery
         (MLD)-Based Multicast Forwarding ("IGMP/MLD Proxying")",
         RFC 4605, August 2006.

   [8]   Holbrook, H. and B. Cain, "Source-Specific Multicast for IP",
         RFC 4607, August 2006.

   [9]   Liu, H., Cao, W., and H. Asaeda, "Lightweight IGMPv3 and MLDv2
         Protocols",
         draft-ietf-mboned-lightweight-igmpv3-mldv2-04.txt (work in
         progress), September 2008.

8.2.  Informative References

   [10]  Koodli, Ed., R., "Fast Handovers for Mobile IPv6", RFC 4068,
         July 2005.

   [11]  Leung, K., Devarapalli, V., Chowdhury, K., and B. Patil, "Proxy
         Mobile IPv6", draft-ietf-netlmm-proxymip6-16.txt (work in
         progress), May 2008.

   [12]  Schmidt, T., Waehlisch, M., and G. Fairhurst, "Multicast
         Mobility in MIPv6: Problem Statement and Brief Survey",
         draft-irtf-mobopts-mmcastv6-ps-04.txt (work in progress),



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         July 2008.

   [13]  Jelger, C. and T. Noel, "Multicast for Mobile Hosts in IP
         Networks: Progress and Challenges", IEEE Wireless
         Comm. pp.58-64, October 2002.














































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Authors' Addresses

   Hitoshi Asaeda
   Keio University
   Graduate School of Media and Governance
   5322 Endo
   Fujisawa, Kanagawa  252-8520
   Japan

   Email: asaeda@wide.ad.jp


   Thomas C. Schmidt
   HAW Hamburg
   Dept. Informatik
   Berliner Tor 7
   Hamburg,   D-20099
   Germany

   Email: Schmidt@informatik.haw-hamburg.de































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