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Versions: 00 01                                                         
ANIMA                                                       J. Dang, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                  S. Jiang
Intended status: Standards Track                                  Huawei
Expires: 12 April 2022                                             Z. Du
                                                            China Mobile
                                                            Z. Zhou, Ed.
                                                                  Huawei
                                                          9 October 2021


    An Autonomic Mechanism for Resource-based Network Services Auto-
                               deployment
          draft-dang-anima-network-service-auto-deployment-01

Abstract

   This document specifies an autonomic mechanism for resource-based
   network services deployment through the Autonomic Control Plane (ACP)
   in an Autonomic Network.  This mechanism uses the GRASP in [RFC8990]
   to exchange the information among the autonomic nodes so that the
   resource among the service path can be coordinated.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on 12 April 2022.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2021 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents (https://trustee.ietf.org/
   license-info) in effect on the date of publication of this document.
   Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights



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   and restrictions with respect to this document.  Code Components
   extracted from this document must include Simplified BSD License text
   as described in Section 4.e of the Trust Legal Provisions and are
   provided without warranty as described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Terminology & Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Resource-based Network Services Auto-deployment Solution  . .   4
     4.1.  ResourceManager ASA Discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.2.  Resource Negotiation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.3.  Behavior after Negotiation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Autonomic Resource Management Objectives  . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  Process of Network Service Auto-deployment  . . . . . . . . .   6
     6.1.  Process between Service Initiator and APE . . . . . . . .   6
     6.2.  Process between APE and ASBR  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   7.  Compatibility with Other Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   9.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   10. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   11. Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   With the network development, a class of services with resource
   requirements (such as bandwidth, latency, and jitter) are already
   emerging, such as video, LR, VR and so on.  From network perspective,
   this kind of service clearly has a source IP address and a
   destination IP address.  Therefore, once the kind of service is
   delivered by a network, this network service clearly has an access
   node and a departure node in the network.  Here, the access node is
   called APE, and the departure node is called DPE.  Actually there may
   be multiple Transmit nodes between APE and DPE in a network domain,
   and even cross multiple network domains through ASBRs.  Then, the
   deployment of network services needs to negotiate network resources.

   As is surveyed, the resource in campus network are more uneven than
   in the operator's network, such as wireless connections.  Ideally, as
   a centralized system, the controller can automatically perform
   resource discovery and overall allocation.  Actually, all devices in
   the campus network cannot be conveniently, availably communicated
   with one controller, such as, some sensors with complex installation
   environment, the network devices from different vendors.  Therefore,
   a new distributed mechanism in network is required to negotiate the
   resource information for network service auto-deployment.



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   The original purpose of this document was to validate the design of
   the Autonomic Networking Infrastructure (ANI) for a realistic use
   case.  It shows how the ANI can be applied to negotiate the resource
   information for network service auto-deployment.

   This document defines an autonomic technical objectives for Resource-
   based Network Services Auto-deployment.  The GeneRic Autonomic
   Signaling Protocol (GRASP) is specified by [RFC8990] and can make use
   of the technical objective to provide a solution for Resource-based
   Network Services Auto-deployment.  An important purpose of the
   present document is to use it for validation of the design of GRASP
   and other components of the ANI as described in [RFC8993].

   The goal of this document is to complete the resource-based self-
   adaptation among service and network nodes via GRASP.  And this
   document is not a complete functional specification of an autonomic
   system of Resource-based Network Services Auto-deployment, and it
   does not describe all detailed aspects of the GRASP objective
   parameters and Autonomic Service Agent (ASA) procedures necessary to
   build a complete system.  Instead, it describes the architectural
   framework utilizing the components of the ANI, outlines the different
   deployment options and aspects, and defines GRASP objectives for use
   in building the system.  It also provides some basic parameter
   examples.

2.  Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119.

3.  Terminology & Abbreviations

   Service Initiator(SI): It may be an end user, a Customer Edge (CE),
   or a controller that initiates a path-dependent and resource-based
   network service.

   Provider Edge (PE): Provider Edge node where the network service
   starts or ends.

   Access PE (APE): A first provider edge where the service initiator
   connects to the network or where the path-dependent and resource-
   based network service starts.

   Departure PE (DPE): A last provider edge where the path-dependent and
   resource-based network service ends.

   Transmit node: A transmit node between APE and DPE.



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   AS Border Router (ASBR): AS Border Router which is an edge node of
   the domain in the cross-domain scenario.  It may also be a PE node.

4.  Resource-based Network Services Auto-deployment Solution

   This section describes the internal architecture of resource-based
   network services auto-deployment.  As noted in Section 1, this is not
   a complete description of a solution, which will depend on the
   detailed design of the relevant Autonomic Service Agents (ASAs).  It
   uses the generic discovery and negotiation protocol defined by
   [RFC8990] and the relevant GRASP objectives are defined in Section 5.

   The procedures described below are carried out by an ASA in each
   device that participates in the solution.  We will refer to this as
   the ResourceManager ASA.  If a device containing a ResourceManager
   ASA which is used up its resource, it can request more resource
   according to its requirements.  It should decide the type and value
   of the requested resource and request it via the mechanism described
   in Section 6.

4.1.  ResourceManager ASA Discovery

   A ResourceManager ASA that needs additional resource should firstly
   discover peers that may be able to provide extra resource.  The ASA
   should send out a GRASP Discovery message that contains a
   ResourceManager Objective option in order to discover peers also
   supporting that option.  Then, it should choose one such peer, most
   likely the first to respond.

   A device that receives a Discovery message with a ResourceManager
   Objective option should respond with a GRASP Response message if it
   contains a ResourceManager ASA.  If it does not contain
   ResourceManager ASA, the device ignore this message.  Further details
   of the discovery process are described in [RFC8990].

4.2.  Resource Negotiation

   After discover step, the requesting ResourceManager ASA will act as a
   GRASP negotiation initiator by sending a GRASP Request message with a
   ResourceManager Objective option.  The requesting ResourceManager ASA
   indicates in this option the value of the requested resource.  This
   starts a GRASP negotiation process.









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   When the provider ResourceManager ASA receives a subsequent Request
   message, it should conduct a GRASP negotiation sequence, using
   Negotiate, Confirm Waiting, and Negotiation End messages as
   appropriate.  The Negotiate messages carry a ResourceManager
   Objective option, which will indicate the resource type and value
   offered to the requesting ASA.

   During the negotiation, the requesting ResourceManager ASA will
   decide at each step how large resource need to offer.  That decision,
   and the decision to end the negotiation, are implementation choices.
   As to the provider ResourceManager ASA responses how large resource
   they can offer and reserve enough resource during this negotiation
   step.  A resource shortage may cause a device to indicate the
   existing available value within a ResourceManager Objective option to
   the requesting ASA.  The requesting ASA compares whether the resource
   data received is the same locally.  If they are not the same, the
   requesting ASA might decide whether to accept the resource.  If not,
   the requesting ASA might terminate the negotiation via Negotiation
   End messages with an error code string.

   As described in [RFC8990], negotiation will continue until either end
   stops it with a Negotiation End message.  If the negotiation
   succeeds, the ASA that provides the resource will remove the
   negotiated resource from its pool, and the requesting ASA will add
   it.  If the negotiation fails, the party sending the Negotiation End
   message may include an error code string.

4.3.  Behavior after Negotiation

   Upon receiving a GRASP Negotiation End message that indicates that
   the acceptable resource is available.  The resource providing device
   remove the acceptable resource from its resource pool and the
   requesting device may use the negotiated resource without further
   messages.

5.  Autonomic Resource Management Objectives

   This section defines the GRASP technical objective options that are
   used to support autonomic resource management.

   The ResourceManager Objective option is a GRASP Objective option
   conforming to the GRASP specification [RFC8990].  Its name is
   "ResourceManager", and it carries the following data items as its
   value: the resource value.  Since GRASP is based on CBOR (Concise
   Binary Object Representation) [RFC8949], the format of the
   ResourceManager Objective option is described in the Concise Data
   Definition Language (CDDL) [RFC8610] as follows:




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   objective = ["ResourceManager", objective-flags, loop-count,
   [restype, resval]]

   loop-count = 0..255 ; as in the GRASP specification

   objective-flags /= ; as in the GRASP

   resourcetype /= 0...4; requested or offered resource type, such as
   bandwidth, latency or jitter.

   resval /= 1...1000000; If the restype is bandwidth, the value ranges
   in Mbit/s; If the restype is latency, the value ranges in
   microsecond; If the restype is jitter, the value ranges in
   microsecond.

6.  Process of Network Service Auto-deployment

   The network service auto-deployment system includes Service
   Initiator, APE, DPE, and even ASBR.

   The network service clearly has a APE and a DPE in the network.
   Actually there may be multiple Transmit nodes between APE and DPE in
   a single network domain, or even cross multiple network domains
   through ASBRs.  In a single network domain, APE holds all resource
   information to DPE.  In multiple domain network domains, APE holds
   all resource information to ASBR, and ASBR holds all resource
   information to DPE.

   The Service Initiator initiates resource negotiation for a certain
   network service to APE.  If in one single domain, APE should respond
   to the message with the resource valued offered.  If in multiple
   domain network domains, APE should initiates resource negotiation to
   ASBR, and respond to the message with the resource valued offered
   until receiving ASBR's response.

6.1.  Process between Service Initiator and APE

   The Service Initiator containing a ResourceManager ASA should send
   out a GRASP Discovery message that contains a ResourceManager
   Objective option in order to discover APE also supporting that
   option.  The APE that receives a Discovery message with a
   ResourceManager Objective option should respond with a GRASP Response
   message if it contains a ResourceManager ASA.

   The ASA in the Service Initiator will act as a GRASP negotiation
   initiator by sending a GRASP Request message with a ResourceManager
   Objective option.  The ASA indicates in this option the value of the
   requested resource.



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   When this ASA in the APE receives a subsequent Request message, it
   should conduct a GRASP negotiation sequence, using Negotiate, Confirm
   Waiting, and Negotiation End messages as appropriate.  The Negotiate
   messages carry a ResourceManager Objective option with the resource
   value offered to the requesting ASA.

   If in a single network domain, this ASA in the APE check whether the
   local resource data meets the requirements of the request.  If it
   meets the requested requirement, the APE should respond with a GRASP
   Negotiate messages with the resource type and the resource value
   requested.  If it doesn't meet the requested requirement, the APE
   should respond with a GRASP Negotiate messages with the resource
   value offered.

   If in the multiple network domain, this ASA in the APE should act a
   GRASP negotiation initiator described in Section 6.2.

   When the ASA in the Service Initiator receives a Negotiate message,
   it should check whether the resource value within the Negotiate
   message is the same as the resource value requested.  If it is same,
   the Service Initiator should send GRASP Negotiation End messages
   indicating that the negotiation was successful.  If it is not same,
   the Service Initiator should decide whether to accept this
   negotiation.  If accepting this negotiation, it send should send
   GRASP Negotiation End messages indicating that the negotiation was
   successful.  If not accepting this negotiation, it should send GRASP
   Negotiation End messages indicating that the negotiation fails.

6.2.  Process between APE and ASBR

   The ASA in the APE should send a Confirm Waiting message to the
   Service Initiator, to extend its timeout.  When the new resource
   becomes available confirmed by ASBR, the APE responds with a GRASP
   Negotiate message with a resource value offered.

   Other processes between APE and ASBR are the same as between Service
   Initiator and APE.

7.  Compatibility with Other Technologies

   A gateway device gateway device is adopted between the GRASP network
   and the MPLS network.  As is known, the RSVP belong to the
   distributed mechanism for resource reservation, but it is only
   coupled with MPLS.  Then this device uses the GRASP protocol in the
   GRASP network, and the MPLS protocol in the MPLS network, so that
   resource information can be shared.





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8.  Security Considerations

   It complies with GRASP security considerations.  Relevant security
   issues are discussed in [RFC8990].  The preferred security model is
   that devices are trusted following the secure bootstrap procedure
   [RFC8995] and that a secure Autonomic Control Plane (ACP) [RFC8994]
   is in place.

9.  IANA Considerations

   This document defines a new GRASP Objective option names:
   "ResourceManager" which is need to be added to the "GRASP Objective
   Names" registry.

10.  Acknowledgements

   Valuable comments were received from Michael Richardson and Brian
   Carpenter.

11.  Normative References

   [I-D.ietf-mpls]
              "Multiprotocol Label Switching Architecture",
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3031>.

   [I-D.ietf-spring-segment-routing]
              "Segment Routing Architecture",
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8402>.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.

   [RFC8990]  "GeneRic Autonomic Signaling Protocol (GRASP)",
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8990>.

   [RFC8993]  "A Reference Model for Autonomic Networking",
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8993>.

Authors' Addresses










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   Joanna Dang (editor)
   Huawei
   No.156 Beiqing Road
   Beijing
   P.R. China, 100095
   China

   Email: dangjuanna@huawei.com


   Sheng Jiang
   Huawei
   No.156 Beiqing Road
   Beijing
   P.R. China, 100095
   China

   Email: jiangsheng@huawei.com


   Zongpeng Du
   China Mobile
   32 Xuanwumen West St
   Beijing
   P.R. China, 100053
   China

   Email: duzongpeng@chinamobile.com


   Yujing (editor)
   Huawei
   No.156 Beiqing Road
   Beijing
   P.R. China, 100095
   China

   Email: zhouyujing3@huawei.com













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